Quantcast

Follow Daily Icon

Email Address:

Categories


Warning: parse_str() expects parameter 1 to be string, array given in /home/clients_ssl/www.dailyicon.net/www/magazine/wp-content/plugins/fold-category-lists-231.php on line 296

Posts Tagged ‘Slats’

House K by GRAUX & BAEYENS Architecten

The property is located in a quiet, wooded area. The house is built against the right neighbor. The left neighbor is a detached house. The house is at the front 12.70 wide and is tapered and parallel to the parcel toward the rear. The roof is retracted so that the cornice is at 5.79m. The challenging form of the plot and the orientation, make sure that we have gone looking for a type of home that meets these conditions and also provides an architectural value. The requested program with limited living space was poured into a patio home with abundant light. By choosing this concept, the southern sun invades deep into the house. The living areas at the top are linked to a south facing terrace. The small terrace at the rear of the house composes the views to the wooded area. The entrance, sleeping area, bathroom and storeroom are on the ground floor.

The client chooses a house with enough light and views, but with some privacy. The window openings are chosen in the privacy of the residents. Some windows are recessed so that a few bricks filtered light enters. At the terrace on the top floor is the front covered with white slats. These are rotated so that the west sun may fall on the terrace overlooking the forest. The privacy at the front of the building create introverted spaces on the floor. In terms of materialization we’ve chosen a light brown / beige brick with black aluminum joinery. The edge and the slats in the front are materialized in white aluminum.

House K, Buggenhout, Belgium, by GRAUX & BAEYENS Architecten, Photography by Luc Roymans, Dennis Desmet, via: ArchDaily

Villa Solaire by Jérémie Kœmpgen Architecture

Located in the historic district of Pied de La Plagne, in the village of Morzine (French Alps), this ancient farmhouse was singled out by the municipality as a landmark for traditional 19th century local architecture. Preserving the house overall appearance was of one of the project’s key challenges. Revisiting traditional techniques, architecture firm Jérémie Kœmpgen Architecture has converted it into a luxurious and elegant rental villa.

The idea is to move through this house between four “blocks” steady as rocks, located at each corner of the building. Each independent unit forms a suite with sleeping area and amenities. Between these four blocks, the remaining space is occupied by a succession of stacked floors at different levels in the framework. This continuum of generous space welcomes the activities shared by the inhabitants: cooking, dining, watching a film, conversing in the living room, warming up around the fire.

A uniform cladding wraps the whole farm. One of the challenges of the project was to preserve its appearance, while filtering light into the heart of the building. The traditional technique of decorative cut-outs within the wood strips was used to perform specific perforations within the planks. The design of this simple and contemporary pattern is consistent with the equipment and techniques used by the local carpenter for cutting spruce slats. These cut-outs recall the disjointed battens of the traditional barn, used for drying hay.

Villa Solaire, Morzine, Haute-Savoie, France, by Jérémie Kœmpgen Architecture, via: Flodeau

Jindal’s Pavilion by Paul Archer Design

This new structure at the end of a long garden is a flexible design solution to a complex brief, which called for a quiet space for meditation, work and guest accommodation away from the main house. Operating within the limitations of permitted development for a garden shed, Paul Archer Design divided the building evenly into interior and exterior enclosures. The walls of the pavilion are deliberately ambiguous, separated from the roof plane by large areas of glass, while the side facing the house is cut cleverly into a series of mirrored glass slats illuminated by the sunlight from behind.

Inside, views are restricted to the boundaries of the sanctuary, editing-out the suburban landscape beyond, while double sliding doors allow the space to flow seamlessly out into the courtyard when desired. A timber storage wall incorporates numerous functions, including a fold-down desk and bed, transforming the use of the pavilion according to which component of furniture is deployed.

Jindal’s Pavilion, London, England, United Kingdom, by Paul Archer Design
Photography © Will Pryce, via: ArchDaily

Mistral Wine Bar by Studio Arthur Casas

The space, in its raw form, was long, hollow, and had high ceilings. Arthur Casas built out the shop and used it’s length to his advantage. The architect deisnged a long hallway, where the walls are angled and lined with a high gloss white plastic, black mirror, and vertical slats of raw wood. Wine bottles are held in the wall by cut-out holes, just big enough for the bottle shaft. With each label facing upward, Mistral’s store guests can walk through the shop and easily view the products. The long hallway leads into the bar area, where the wall materials from the wine display area continue. The space is modern, yet warm and approachable; making it a great spot to grab some friends and enjoy a wine tasting.

Mistral, São Paulo, Brazil, by Studio Arthur Casas, Photography by FG+SG fotografia de arquitectura, via: Knstrct

Ivy Tables by Paola Navone For Emu

Paola Navone has designed a series of tables characterised by their ironed sheet metal mesh leg, which reprises the game of volumetric spaces that are characteristic of the Ivy collection. Available with an embossed scratch-resistant sheet metal top and with sheet metal combined with teak slats or white Carrara marble.

Ivy 592, Ivy 598, by Paola Navone, for Emu

Baron Summer House by John Pawson

Built as a summer house for Fabien Baron, one’s first impression is of its virtual invisibility. The design draws significantly on local vernacular models which are transformed through the introduction of elements of new materiality and detailing, to create volumes with a contemporary quality of abstraction whose interiors are bathed in light and views. Entry is via a lofty space framed by a pair of walls finished in fine vertical slats of dark stained timber and set below steeply angled roof planes.

Baron House, Southern Sweden by John Pawson

Editor's Picks

Brick Flip Clock
The classic vintage flip clock, reinvented and redesigned, made from a stainless steel case and a precision machine. Mount it on the wall or simply place it on a desk. [more...]

Suggested Reading

The Story of Eames Furniture
Brimming with images and insightful text, this unique book is the benchmark reference on what is arguably the most influential and important furniture brand of our time. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

The Guggenheim: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Making of the Modern Museum
First-ever book to explore the process behind one of the greatest modern buildings in America. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

MoonFire: The Epic Journey of Apollo 11
A unique tribute to the defining scientific mission of our time, the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Cars Freedom Style Sex Power Motion Colour Everything

Cars
Freedom Style Sex Power Motion Colour Everything. This lavish and beautifully designed book is the gift book for all car enthusiasts and design aficionados. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Design Icons

Fjordfiesta Scandia Senior
by Hans Brattrud

A Norwegian furniture design classic from 1957, Scandia Senior is a comfortable high-back easy chair with a leather head cushion, on a satin swivel base. [more...]

Resources

More Books

Case Study Houses
“It’s a huge coffee-table book, which analyses each of the houses in chronological order, with plans, sketches and glorious photographs.” [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

The Eames Lounge Chair
The book examines the evolution of a design icon and places it in its cultural, historical and social context. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

The U.N. Building
Symbol of world humanitarianism, a beacon of unity after the Second World War. More than 50 years on, the 39-story building is regarded as one of the pinnacles of mid-century modernism. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Loblolly House
Including a DVD of the film "A House in the Trees", a real-time documentary of the design, fabrication, and assembly of this amazing house. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Desire
The Shape of Things to Come. An up-to-date comprehensive survey on furniture and object design today, showcasing the crème de la crème of designers. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Marcel Wanders
Behind the Ceiling is the first monograph on one of the most influential, prolific and celebrated international designers today. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

How to Wrap Five Eggs
A mid-60s classic of Japanese design. Stunningly laid-out paean to traditional Japanese packaging is rife with sumptuous black and white photos of all manner of boxes, wrappers and containers that appear at once homely and sophisticated, ingeniously utilitarian yet fine and rare. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Services

 
 
 

Warning: get_object_vars() expects parameter 1 to be object, null given in /home/clients_ssl/www.dailyicon.net/www/magazine/wp-content/plugins/intensedebate/intensedebate.php on line 599