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Photography: Bertone Series by Benedict Redgrove

In a distinct artistic approach that highlights geometry, architecture and engineering, Benedict Redgrove has captured some of the company’s most radical concept cars from the 1960s and 70s – some never seen before – including designs for Alfa Romeo, Lamborghini and Lancia. The series of images which was originally commissioned by Wallpaper Magazine, exudes a specialty in styling, coach building and manufacturing, with Bertone’s vision categorized by abstract angular frameworks, a use of unique materials for standard auto parts and super-sleek interiors built for luxury and functionality.

Photography by Benedict Redgrove, for Bertone Concept Car Design Studio

Silvertop House by John Lautner

The home was commissioned in 1956 for Kenneth Reiner, who made a small fortune on ladies hair clips and aviation patents. He worked very closely with Lautner to create this house, and Lautner built elements into the home specifically according to Reiner’s specifications; in the event that the equipment didn’t exist to meet those specifications, Reiner would often design and make the necessary piece for Lautner. Some Reiner – designed elements in the home include “lights that pivot into the ceiling, and electrically-controlled skylights.”

The result of all the efforts of the two men was an incredible home, with “faucet-less sinks that automatically filled with water; a dining table with a hydraulic pedestal that was lowered for cocktails and elevated for meals; a system for heating and cooling that could not be seen or heard; and controls for lights and appliances that were discreetly set into walls and doors jambs,” plus a cantilevered driveway, as the LA Times noted in their obituary for Reiner, who passed away in 2011.

Silvertop House, Los Angeles, California, by John Lautner, via: Curbed

Cove 6 by Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects

The site, located on an exposed cliff edge overlooking a rocky peninsula, is perched above a dramatic seascape with spectacular views. The site is 1 of 6 exclusive use areas permitted on this reserve. The place is characterized by its rolling landforms and the dense indigenous vegetation of extraordinary variety. “Great care has been taken to promote the natural attributes of the site with the use of materials to complement the natural colour pallet and textures of the site to provide the least impact both during construction and after completion. The approach has therefore been a pavilion that blends with and does not overpower nature with a cohesive architectural character where it comes to scale, proportion and the articulation of the building form. It is airy, yet firmly anchored into the landscape by means of heavy stone clad walls,” says partner Stefan Antoni.

The location of the site invited large glazed areas and extensive use of outdoor spaces, with each aspect of the house having a private terrace or deck. The open plan linear composition of the interior spaces allows views from every room. To take advantage of the sea and surrounding golf course views and to provide protection from the extreme Cape Coastal climate, the living spaces were designed with South West/North East orientations, resulting in an open flowing space with both uninterrupted sea facing terraces and protected courtyards. This allows the house to ‘live’ on both sides with the main living spaces forming the link between inside and outside. The orientation gives the owners the option of sheltered courtyards on the leeward side in poor weather conditions or the use of extensive terraces on the windward side on sunny and wind free days. The through-views also ensure that one always experiences the sea and adjacent rolling landscapes taking opportunity of the site.

Cove 6, Knyzna, South Africa, by Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects
Photography by SAOTA

IKEA – The Time Travel Experiment

This creative Time Travel IKEA Campaign wants to prove how their furniture will accommodate any needs no matter at what stage of life you are at.

“The everyday is exciting! It’s on those seemingly ordinary days life happens and changes. And when it does, so does our home”, says Johan Wickmark, Global Catalogue Manager.

#IKEAtimetravel http://bit.ly/1sU06tt

11+ World Clock by Cloudandco

The 11+ World Clock reinterprets the traditional functionality of the clock by creating a unique and playful interaction between the user and the design. Although the face of the World Clock may not seem out of the ordinary, its cylindrical body allows it to display 24 different time zones via a clever rolling mechanism. Independently working hands allow the clock to be quickly rolled back to any of its 24 time zones, while immediately transitioning back to the local time.

11+ World Clock, by Cloudandco

Pallas & Diana Tables by Konstantin Grcic for Classicon

Munich-based designer Konstantin Grcic has developed a new color palette for the ‘Diana’ side table series and the ‘Pallas’ table by Classicon. The collection of powder-coated, sheet metal furniture pieces comprises of honey yellow, signal white, ocean blue, coral red, bronze-brown, chocolate brown and white aluminium colorways. Constructed out of steel, the ‘Pallas’ table reveals itself with detailed kinks and notches; the tactile appeal of the powder coated metal surface gives way to smooth lines, stimulates and engages conversation from the wide, proportionate seating arrangement. ‘Pallas’ is also available in an outdoor variation with a galvanized steel finish.

Pallas Table, Diana Tables, by Konstantin Grcic, for Classicon

Hotel Dupanlou by Studio Makkink & Bey

For the project, Studio Makkink & Bey developed a series of spatial installations that transform the historic Hôtel chambers into lively public spaces. Carpets and curtains create rooms within the room. Antique pieces are scattered throughout, reflecting the past, and new furniture by Prooff “inspire and stimulate the functions of today and tomorrow.”

“Invited by the The French Artistic Nationale Commission Makkink & Bey furnished the main room as well as 23 working/meeting rooms of Hôtel Dupanloup by creating eclectic three dimensional collages of furniture; amongst others Prooff Worksofa’s, EarChairs and SideSeats in new colourschemes, a ‘Dupanloup chair- and table’ specially designed for the project, antique pieces of furniture, a special edition of the Tree trunk Bench and re-designs made of Ikea furniture by students of École Supérieure d’Art et de design d’Orléans that participated in a summer workshop with Studio Makkink & Bey.

Carpets and curtains outline the reprogrammed spaces and introduce a new heraldy that narrates about the content of the local archives (such as from the local Fine Art Museum, the Frac Centre and the House of Jeanne d’Arc). The spirits of the past and present are merged and create rich contexts for researchers -and visitors of the International Research Center of the University of Orléans to meet- and work in. Even when not in use these ‘room in a room’ interiors are intriguing spatial still lifes that portray several layers of time, or as Director of Cultural Affair of the Centre Region Sylvie Le Clech describes them; ‘A treasure hunt across centuries’.

Hotel Dupanlou, Orléans, France, by Studio Makkink & Bey
Photography by Ministère de la culture et de la communication / Drac Centre, François Lauginie, Studio Makkink & Bey

Pollock Arm Chair by Charles Pollock for Knoll

Designed more than half a century ago by the late Charles Pollock, Knoll is reintroducing the iconic ’657 Sling-back Lounge’, also known as the Pollock Arm Chair, a minimal chair of polished chrome steel tubing and natural cowhide. Originally manufactured from 1964-79, the chair has been out of production for nearly 35 years but never out of mind nor off design wish lists. The chair’s tubular steel legs connect to cast-aluminum arms and stretchers with exposed hardware, exemplifying Pollock’s honest approach to design.

Pollock Arm Chair, by Charles Pollock, for Knoll

Boa Nova Tea House by Alvaro Siza Vieira

Renowned Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza has fully renovated the Boa Nova Tea House in Matosinhos, Portugal, one of his earliest commissions (1963). The refurbished building will open as a restaurant, and outside mealtimes it will be possible to visit with guided tours by the Association Casa da Arquitectura. “One of Siza’s first built projects, it is significant that the restaurant is not far from the town of Matosinhos where the architect grew up, and set in a landscape that he was intimately familiar with. It was still possible in Portugal of the 1960s to make architecture by working in close contact with the site, and this work, much like the Leça Swimming Pools of 1966, is about ‘building the landscape’ of this marginal zone on the Atlantic – through a careful analysis of the weather and tides, existing plant life and rock formations, and the relationship to the avenue and city behind.” says Álvaro Siza.

Boa Nova Tea House, Matosinhos, Portugal, by Alvaro Siza Vieira
Photography by Joao Morgado

Desert Courtyard House by Wendell Burnette Architects

The building site, further down a long private drive, levels out toward the west into an edge condition dominated by an expansive vista – layers and layers of distant mountain ranges – that in the evening seem to epitomize the drama of the Arizona Sunset. Due to the elevation of the site beneath the community’s gaze and the entry gate at the road it became important to us – to recede the house as a deep shadow – into the depth and complexity of the desert floor below.

The plinth was cast in place with one material throughout such that a wall, a floor, a ramp, a step, or a bench could be experienced as part of one contiguous stone. The Verde River eventually connects to the Salt River, which collectively tumbles some of the worlds hardest aggregate through the lowest point of the valley, where along with sand and cement, it is harvested for locally produced concrete. A “highway concrete mix” with oversized 1 ½” aggregate was specifically selected for this project and mixed with a small percentage of the earth pigment – raw umber. We wanted to work the surfaces of the plinth in order to reveal the composite qualities of the material, sand, conglomerate gravel, pebbles, broken stone, in a cement matrix, and consequently a window into the geologic time of this place.

The overall height of the landform follows the design guidelines and therefore the ground at precisely 24’ above natural grade in a segmented monocline that spirals almost imperceptibly up and around and out where the solid mass of the courtyard form opens up to the distant west. In conjunction with this geometry, the outsides of the earth and concrete landform are faceted inward 3 degrees from vertical. The hat required for the earth walls protects the monolithic courtyard form as a contiguous part of a faceted shadow that begins at the outermost edge of the monocline and continues inward toward the inner court where it stops just short of itself inscribing an irregular frame for the sky.

Desert Courtyard House, Scottsdale, Arizona, by Wendell Burnette Architects
Photography by Bill Timmerman

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