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Jar RGB by Arik Levy for Lasvit

Jar RGB is a lighting project connecting thin colorful glass blowing techniques and the idea of RGB color mixing. Using white glass for one of the hanging jars allows it to turn into a large light bulb generating the light for the entire fixture. Observing one jar through another and the space surrounding them gives one a unique and everlasting discovery of color superimposition.

Jar RGB by Arik Levy for Lasvit

Brick House by Clare Cousins Architects

Designed for a young family, Melbourne-based Clare Cousins Architects have restored an existing Edwardian house and made a single story addition, engaging with the garden with its meandering facade of glass and bricks. A flexible space, referred to as a studio, is housed on top of the new garage forming a double story mass at the rear of the site to help screen large neighbouring buildings.

Taking advantage of the long linear plot and rear laneway access, a garage with studio above was designed first, conceived as a windowless sculptural form perched on a garage clock to provide a studio or guest bedroom. The house extension curves to maximise its northern orientation and to visually incorporate the native landscaping into the house.

This project plays with raw building materials, in concrete and timber, and with pattern, in brick bonds and linear spacing. The sculptural first floor contains a studio and bathroom inspired by Alvar Alto glassware with a ribbed timber cladding that continues across the west-facing windows to provide solar protection.

Brick House, by Clare Cousins Architects, Photography © Shannon McGrath, via: Flodeau

Radice Stool by Industrial Facility for Mattiazzi

Unlike many other Italian producers, Mattiazzi keeps all the facets of wood production under one roof. By default, they have become a rare company that is able to shape wood as if it were plastic, while embracing ever-increasing challenges through their own R&D. Industrial Facility have continued to push Mattiazzi further into the exploration of robot-craftsmanship – following on from their first collaboration with the Branca Chair.

Radice finds its underlying beauty and simplicity in its structure. It is the bringing together of the front-half of a traditional 4-legged stool with a single back leg – the root. It is a visual improvisation, where two things come together unexpectedly.

“Radice has some tension in its form and it is a slight surprise that the third leg works as well as it does to resolve the overall structure. It is in some ways structurally diagrammatic, yet is made comfortable visually and physically because of how this third leg supports the seat,” says Sam Hecht.

The backrest is small and reassuring, allowing a coat or handbag to rest on it; and the seat is open for large and small people. It is light both visually and in weight and uses no screws or metal fittings, yet also passes stringent BIFMA standards ensuring it is structurally sound, stable and reliable. The wood stain options for Radice are based on the cycle of an autumn leaf turning colour.

Radice Stool, by Industrial Facility, for Mattiazzi

Lisbon House by Bak Gordon Arquitectos

Designed by the acclaimed Portuguese architect Bak Gordon and built in 2010, it won the FAD Award, was nominated for the Mies van der Rohe Prize and was chosen to be part of Portugal’s official representation at the 2010 Venice Architecture Biennale. It was also listed by Wallpaper* magazine as one of the top 20 reasons to visit Portugal.

The house is primarily concrete, which, combined with a sophisticated modern vintage interior, creates a beautiful and soothing space. There are extensive gardens, with five patios, a swimming pool and a pond.

Lisbon House, Portugal, by Bak Gordon Arquitectos, for rent at The Modern House
via: Plastolux

Photography: Invasive Species by Dillon Marsh

In 1996 a palm tree appeared almost overnight in a suburb of Cape Town. This was the world’s first ever disguised cell phone tower. Since then these trees have spread across the city, South Africa and the rest of the world. Invasive Species explores the relationship between the environment and the disguised towers of Cape Town and its surrounds.

Invasive Species, by Dillon Marsh

MM House by StudioMK27

The dwelling consists of two perpendicular rectangular footprints. on the east/west axis is a reinforced concrete shell resembling an extruded version of the iconographic house, complete with a green roof that roots it discretely into the green hilly landscape. this volume contains all the interior program organized in a linear fashion with a sequence of spaces from the garage and entry to the master suite at the other extreme. A screen of retractable slender wooden slats wraps the entire envelope along the exterior glass wall to soften direct sunlight, with the ability to open entirely to the exterior. All the private bedrooms are situated along the eastern elevation facing down the valley, with the housekeepers’ quarters and social spaces along the opposite side, separated by a long linear hallway. at the point where this solid mass intersects with the perpendicular wooden deck, the program becomes neither indoor nor outdoor, with a barbeque, bar and lounge area under the pitched roof but entirely open to the elements. the public living room and tv room flanking this space contain large glass doors that visually, if not spatially, connect the two. the timber terrace extends out towards the lower area of the site, ending in a swimming pool hoisted upon a concrete plinth that reflects the picturesque environment.

MM House, Braganca Paulista, Sao Paulo, Brazil, by StudioMK27, Photography © Fernando Guerra, via: designboom

Tepoztlán Lounge by Cadaval & Solà-Morales

Tepoztlan, is a small town nestled between rocky cliffs located to the south of Mexico City, 50 kilometers away from the vibrant metropolis. With its well preserved historic center and wild countryside, Tepoztlan is a town of legends and deep cultural roots that has been appreciated by writers, poets, artists and musicians over many decades, turning it into their hometown or weekend retreat. Located in this incredible context and surrounded by an astonishing landscape, the Tepoztlan Lounge is the first building completed of a larger project that also includes a series of bungalows of different sizes and designs, which can be rented by years, months or days.

Tepoztlán Lounge, Tepoztlán, Morelos, México, by Cadaval & Solà-Morales

Gardenias by Jaime Hayon for BD Barcelona Design

Gardenias is a collection of furniture for the garden. That’s not a real genre, but it does differentiate Gardenias from other exterior furniture collections. Subtlety, beauty and memory are omnipresent in its design, along with a determination to make the collection broad, varied, multipurpose and open. Further pieces will be added in the future. There will be room for sculptural vases and planters of surprisingly fine terracotta, chairs with or without a pergola, benches and even an attractive watering can.

One of the most outstanding characteristics of the collection is the way its translated the generally rigid and square-shaped image of outdoor metallic furniture to a language that is more romantic in form and also suitable for indoor use. It carries the unmistakable mark of Hayon in the svelte, subtle and feminine forms. It is almost Gaudí-sque (or should we say Gardenia-esque) in so much as it renders metal with organic, almost natural shapes – ones that are more generally seen in furniture made of wood.

Gardenias, by Jaime Hayon, for BD Barcelona Design

Villa L by Powerhouse Company

Designed to fulfil the desires and needs of a young family, Villa L is set in the woods of central Netherlands, fully oriented towards the sun and the views on the garden. Villa L is a spatially diverse residence where every floor has its own strong identity, creating a broad spatial spectrum within a unified whole. A young family with three children asked Powerhouse Company and RAU to design a house that would fulfill their dreams: a paradox of a house that is simple yet surprising, open yet specific, minimal yet luxurious. Powerhouse Company, responsible for the design, resolved these contradictions with a house based on a radical differentiation of spatial experiences on three floors (of which one is subterranean). RAU embedded the sustainable strategy for the villa in the design. Three clear levels, with three very different characters and functionalities as a basis for family life to emerge.

One level is for living, a generously open ground floor. A strip of serving rooms containing storage, toilets and stairs, provides easily access to the luxuriously open living spaces. The kitchen and living room are oriented maximally to the sun and view. In close relation to this living area there are two studies located on the north side next to the entrance.

The collection of rooms on the first floor provides space for sleeping and privacy. Set in a delicate roof garden, all the bedrooms are autonomous volumes crafted in their entirety from dark wood. They work like a village of cabins, providing intimacy and privacy. Every room is like a world of its own with private views over the wooded landscape. The curved basement is for guests, wellness and storage. The excavations allow the pool and the guest rooms to have fully glazed facades and direct access to the garden. The house incorporates innovative sustainable measures including a hot and cold-water storage and extensive use of hidden PV cells. The basement contains a dedicated area for the high-end energy saving installations.

Villa L, Utrecht, The Netherlands, by Powerhouse Company, in collaboration with RAU

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