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Exhibition: Gerrit Rietveld: The Revolution of Space

The Dutchman Gerrit Rietveld (1888 – 1964) was one of the most important designers and architects of the 20th century. He was trained as a carpenter and was associated early on with the De Stijl movement and its central figures, Theo van Doesburg and Piet Mondrian. Beginning in 1918, his work reflects the artistic ideals of this group. Rietveld transformed objects and buildings into abstract compositions of lines and planes, mainly in black, white, grey and the primary colours yellow, red and blue. However, he initially developed his legendary Red-Blue Chair in 1918 without the striking colour scheme from which its name is derived – the coloured version dates from the year 1923. Rietveld’s first architectural project, the now legendary Rietveld-Schröder House, followed in 1924. In search of ways to further develop his radical aesthetic ideas, Rietveld soon distanced himself from the aesthetics of De Stijl. Throughout the 1930s, he pursued experimental work, especially with innovative materials such as plywood and aluminium. One example of the unusual furnishings created out of these materials is the Zig-Zag Chair (c. 1932). After 1945, Rietveld was primarily active as an architect, designing prestigious buildings such as the Dutch Pavilion on the premises of the Venice Biennale. By the time of the major De Stijl retrospective at the New York Museum of Modern Art in 1952/53, Rietveld had attained international recognition as a pioneer of modern design. This Vitra Design Museum exhibition is the first major retrospective on Gerrit Rietveld to be presented to the German-speaking public since 1996. Comprising around 320 objects – including furniture, models, paintings, photographs, films and approximately 100 original drawings and plans – it offers a comprehensive overview of the Dutch designer’s work. In addition, it incorporates comparative works by contemporaries such as Theo van Doesburg, Bart van der Leck, Le Corbusier and Marcel Breuer, thus shedding light on the mutual exchange of ideas and Rietveld’s place in the context of other modernist currents.

Viewed in the light of this new retrospective, many facets of Gerrit Rietveld’s work prove to be astonishingly relevant today. For example, his urban plans appear to have much more in common with current developments than many radical utopian concepts put forth by other modernist architects, since Rietveld’s were based on social aspects rather than dogmatic principles. And with a series of furniture for self-assembly in the 1930s and ’40s, Rietveld anticipated even today’s do-it-yourself trend and the concept of “open design”.

Gerrit Rietveld: The Revolution of Space, May 17 – September 16, at Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, Germany

Exhibition: Antony Gormley: Facts and Systems | Fatos e Sistemas

The first special project by White Cube in Brazil, Facts and Systems (Fatos e Sistemas) is an exhibition of two new series of works. In one room, the artist will present dramatic body forms made from stacked, mild steel blocks that punctuate and articulate the gallery. In another room, he will present a group of linear sculptures made from 6mm steel road that continue his investigation into architectural space.

Antony Gormley: Facts and Systems | Fatos e Sistemas, White Cube, Rua Agostinho Rodrigues Filho 550. São Paulo, Brazil.

Design Dance at Salone Internazionale del Mobile

“Experiencing an object is dependent on the forces of the mind and soul. To perceive means to be moved, and to be moved means to form.”
- Johannes Itten

The main event at the Saloni 2012 is dedicated to those men, those companies and, in particular, to those hundreds of objects that laid the ground for the Italian design system and its aspirations. Taking the objects as a starting point, therefore, allowing them — whether they be useful, good-looking, useless, debateable — to demonstrate the great power contained within themselves is, basically, what “Design Dance” is all about, furthering the great Cosmit tradition of combining trade fair and commercial
mandate with art and communication.

Design Dance” — a project by Michela Marelli and Francesca Molteni, enables the works by the protagonists of design to speak and act, dance even. The objects become actors and storytellers because, as with all the fruits of human creativity, they narrate the emotional run-up to their inception. Modern day objects and objects from the past, classical and modern, together with SaloneSatellite designs that have “come true” by going into production.

Many of the products from Salone Internazionale del Mobile exhibition will be presented at iSaloni WorldWide Moscow in October.

Design Dance, Teatro dell’Arte at the Triennale di Milano, April 17 – 22, 2012, Milan, Italy, Cosmit

Exhibition: Japan Creative: Peter Marigold & Hinoki Kogei

Hinoki Kogei is Japan’s leading woodwork factory, founded in 1977 by Chuzo Tozawa. British designer Peter Marigold collaborated with the Company to create a design which incorporates a woodworking technique that has been used for centuries.

Japan Creative is a non-profit organization founded to respond to the destructive earthquake of March 2011, an event that led to some rethinking of the aesthetics and value of design. The exhibit, curated by Hiroshi Naito, seeks to interpret this tremendous hardship, returning to the roots of traditional Japanes objects and crafts. The exhibition theme “Simple Vision” encompasses the idea of redefining established design rules to interpret them with a new spirit that is open to different cultures.

Japan Creative: Peter Marigold & Hinoki Kogei, April 17 – 22, at Museo Minguzzi, Via Palermo, 11, Milan, Photography © Daily Icon

Still & Sparkling by Nendo for Lasvit

Each of the five concepts presented at Superstudio in Milan explores a different, distinctive approach to glass achieved by the accomplished artisans in the Lasvit workshop in Nový Bor. For Lasvit’s Inhale Lamp, glass blowers form big air bubbles then inhale to produce an unusual shape with negative air pressure. X-Ray vases capitalize on transparency and reflection, two key characteristics of glass, to transform a series of domes within a larger mirrored dome, into a subtle, ever-changing optical effect. Press lamps in pendant and floor styles rely on light sources tucked into compressed glass tubes to produce soft, organic forms. Innerblow and Overflow tables deploy two techniques using metal forms and the flowing quality of molten glass to create smooth and water-like surfaces. Growing Vases are whimsical objects in which glass pipes give the illusion of vases blooming out of flowers.

Innerflow, Overflow, Inhale, Press (Smoke), X-Ray Vase, by Nendo, for Lasvit

Exhibtion: The Utopian Impulse: Buckminster Fuller & the Bay Area


Buckminster Fuller and Chuck Byrne, Building Construction/Geodesic Dome, United States Patent Office no. 2,682,235, from the portfolio Inventions: Twelve Around One, 1981; screen print in white ink on clear polyester film; 30 in. x 40 in. (76.2 cm x 101.6 cm); Collection SFMOMA, gift of Chuck and Elizabeth Byrne; © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, All Rights reserved. Published by Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati.


Buckminster Fuller and Chuck Byrne, Motor Vehicle-Dymaxion Car, United States Patent Office no. 2,101,057, from the portfolio Inventions: Twelve Around One, 1981; screen print in white ink on clear polyester film; 30 in. x 40 in. (76.2 cm x 101.6 cm); Collection SFMOMA, gift of Chuck and Elizabeth Byrne; © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, All Rights reserved. Published by Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati.


Buckminster Fuller and Chuck Byrne, Undersea Island-Submarisle, United States Patent Office no. 3,080,583,from the portfolio Inventions: Twelve Around One, 1981; screen print on Lenox paper; 30 in. x 40 in. (76.2 cm x 101.6 cm); Collection SFMOMA, gift of Chuck and Elizabeth Byrne; © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, All Rights reserved. Published by Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati.


Buckminster Fuller and Chuck Byrne, Non-Symetrical Tension-Integrity Structures, United States Patent Office no. 3,866,366, from the portfolio Inventions: Twelve Around One, 1981; screen print in white ink on clear polyester film; 30 in. x 40 in. (76.2 cm x 101.6 cm); Collection SFMOMA, gift of Chuck and Elizabeth Byrne; © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, All Rights reserved. Published by Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati.


Buckminster Fuller and Chuck Byrne, Laminar Geodesic Dome, United States Patent Office no. 3,203,144, from the portfolio Inventions: Twelve Around One, 1981; screen print in white ink on clear polyester film; 30 in. x 40 in. (76.2 cm x 101.6 cm); Collection SFMOMA, gift of Chuck and Elizabeth Byrne; © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, All Rights reserved. Published by Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati.


Buckminster Fuller and Chuck Byrne, 4D House, United States Patent Office no. 1,793, from the portfolio Inventions: Twelve Around One, 1981; screen print on Lenox paper; 30 in. x 40 in. (76.2 cm x 101.6 cm); Collection SFMOMA, gift of Chuck and Elizabeth Byrne; © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, All Rights reserved. Published by Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati.

The Bay Area has long attracted dreamers, progressives, nonconformists, and designers. Buckminster Fuller was all of these, and although he never lived in San Francisco, his ideas have spawned many local experiments in technology, design, and sustainability. The first to consider Fuller’s legacy in the Bay Area, this exhibition features some of his most iconic projects, as represented in a Fuller print portfolio recently acquired by SFMOMA, Inventions: Twelve Around One. Along with Fuller inventions like the 4D House, Geodesic Dome, World Game, and Dymaxion car, the exhibition presents Bay Area endeavors — from Ant Farm’s 1972 domed Convention City proposal to the North Face Oval Intention tent, and from IwamotoScott’s Jellyfish House to One Laptop Per Child — inspired by Fuller’s visionary designs connecting technology, ecology, and social responsibility.

The Utopian Impulse: Buckminster Fuller and the Bay Area, March 31 – July 29, 2012,
at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, SFMOMA

Chandlo Dressing Table by Doshi Levien

Chandlo was designed as a special prototype made by BD Barcelona for Das Haus 2012. This was an installation by Doshi Levien for IMM Cologne that explored their vision of a perfect home. Das Haus consisted of interconnected spaces opening up to a central courtyard. The different areas of the home depended mainly on objects and furniture to define space.

The seemingly abstract composition of the mirrors, cabinet and surface is based on the gestures and daily ritual of dressing up and grooming, celebrating the enjoyment of getting dressed and the importance of personal grooming as part of our daily well being ritual.

An architectural composition of forms and planes are designed to be viewed from all sides, revealing different aspects of the object as you walk around it. Chandlo means moon shape and also Bindi that is the coloured dot worn by Indian women on the forehead to which the circular mirror makes reference.

Our intention was to create a composition in which the elements are holding each other in position without actually touching. To maintain the simplicity of this deconstructed arrangement, we had to conceal the production methods and this presented many technical challenges overcome masterfully by BD Barcelona.

Chandlo Dressing Table, by Doshi Levien

Tugendhat Villa by Mies van der Rohe Restored

In March, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Tugendhat Villa reopened after an $8.8 million, two-year reconstruction. Using family photographs, archival material, visiting Mies’ other buildings in the U.S. and Europe, the Tugendhat redesign team focused on, as Villa Director Iveta Cerna said “identifying authenticity.”

The Villa, built in 1930, was the family home of the Tugendhats only until 1938 when they fled the country due to World War II. Fritz and Greta Tugendhat worked closely with Mies, who designed the site-specific building to make excellent use of steel, glass and concrete, and flowing spatial srrangement. The building was not well maintained under communism. Many of the original furnishings and other elements went missing and structural work needed to be done. Work included removing things added in the years after the Tugendhats had left, as well as hunting down original furniture, and when those couldn’t be found painstakingly making exact copies. The result is a renewed near-perfect example of one of Mies’s “space must be felt” creations.

Tugendhat Villa, Brno, Czech Republic, by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s, via: Dwell

Favoris Collection by Moustache with Corian

To present this new colour range, DuPont™ Corian® called upon 4 designers or galleries, known for their quality and relevant editorial policy and for the innovative character of their collections. Moustache is proud and honoured to have been chosen by DuPont™ on the French market to create this collection. The Favoris Collection was enthusiastically and rigorously pieced together over the past year through context elaboration and exchange of ideas. Managed by Moustache, produced in association alongside and with the complicity of Corian® and Créa Diffusion, the Favoris Collection was designed by Ionna Vautrin, Inga Sempé, François Azambourg, Sébastien Cordoléani and Benjamin Graindorge

Favoris is the one entitled to special treatment due to merit and beauty and also the one who boasts a privileged place near the “all-powerful”. But Favoris is also, and this is less known, the French name commonly used to describe the long piece of hair on each side of the face and its eventual growth into a beard. Having changed from hair into a beard, the Favoris changed from the beard into a Moustache… The Favoris Collection evolved from its side-stepping into temporary openings of a constraint free area without the usual duty of “sticking” to the market-trends. It proposes observation and contemplation of a series of objects designed with the intention of showing, revealing or exaggerating the sensitive nature of a material: the Corian®. Emancipated and liberated from routine questions and functions which sometimes become purposely secondary, the Favoris Collection by Moustache with Corian® also invites you to observe how – putting the Corian® panel presentation-logic aside – this material can become round or in relief and boasts being from an assumed search for beauty.

Favoris Collection, for Moustache, at Corian® Colour Evolution, 2012 Milan Design Week, Spazio Fiorentine, via Savona 35, Milan, April 16–22

Carousel Weather Vane by George Nelson & Associates

Wright is set to auction a weather vane designed by George Nelson for the Howard Miller Clock Company of Zeeland, Michigan.

Carousel Weather Vane, 1954-1955, by George Nelson & Associates, by Howard Miller Clock Company, Estimate: $5,000–7,000, Auction at Wright

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