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Braun Clock GIF by Dieter Rams, Dietrich Lubs

There is an abundance of animated GIFs on the web, but our favorite by far is this black & white Braun Clock face. Mezmorizing.

We give it a 10:10. Braun Clock Face, design by Dieter Rams, Dietrich Lubs
Buy the Book: Less and More: The Design Ethos of Dieter Rams, at Amazon

Exhibition: Realstadt.Wünsche als Wirklichkeit

Berlin is playing host to REALSTADT.Wünsche als Wirklichkeit [Realstadt.Wishes Knocking on Reality's Doors]. The focal point in this exhibition will be not only the concept of the City but also the way we deal with the City. It is the wishes of very many different actors playing an active part in shaping the City that are central to the exhibition: mundane wishes and spectacular ones, idealistic and economic ones, local and global ones. Cities, after all, are built from wishes, animated by wishes and pulsing with wishes.

A vast array of around 300 architectural and planning models and 80 exemplary projects from all over Germany testify to the wish for change and the energy needed to make it happen. In response to a nationwide call, these models were submitted by local authorities, town planning offices, universities, planning initiatives and individuals. The prize-winning projects of the competition “National Prize for Integrated Urban Development and Baukultur”, which was organised in 2009 by the Federal Ministry of Transport, Building and Urban Development represented important points of reference. They include blueprints for extensive urban redevelopments and pinpoint interventions, realized concepts and shelved competition entries, participatory processes and bold individual statements.

Realstadt.Wünsche als Wirklichkeit is staged in the 8,000 m2 turbine hall of the power station Kraftwerk Berlin-Mitte, which was built in 1961. For REALSTADT it is making its debut as an exhibition venue. Its stark austerity lends overwhelming resonance to the exhibition’s urban impulses. These are being displayed on two levels and evoke something like the potential of normalcy.

Exhibition: Realstadt.Wünsche als Wirklichkeit, October 2 – November 28,
at Kraftwerk Mitte, Berlin

Exhibition: Bucky Fuller and Spaceship Earth

Curated by Norman Foster and Luis Fernández-Galiano, the exhibition features drawings and models including the recently completed recreation of the Dymaxion car. Foster worked with Fuller for the last 12 years of his life and explains that Fuller ‘had a profound influence on my own work and thinking’. The new Dymaxion car was commissioned by Foster based on Fuller’s own drawings and prototypes. The prototype was built in East Sussex by the car restoration company Crosthwaite and Gardiner.

Exhibition: Bucky Fuller and Spaceship Earth, Ivorypress Art + Books, Madrid, Spain, September 1 to October 30, via: designboom

Architecture of Dance by Santiago Calatrava for NYC Ballet

Santiago Calatrava collaborated with the New York City Ballet for their 2010 spring season festival of new choreography, “Architecture of Dance.” One of the major thrusts of ballet dance is to appear to defy gravity, so working with Calatrava, who is known for his architectural works suggesting flight, makes perfect sense. The ”Architecture of Dance” festival included seven world premiere ballets, five of which included sets designed by Calatrava. Four new scores were also commissioned for the festival. For the performances, eight new cocktails were created one for each choreographer, and a one for Santiago Calatrava: Sangria of Spanish Red Wine, Triple Sec, Rum, Vodka & Seasonal Fruits.

Architecture of Dance, by Santiago Calatrava, for New York City Ballet
via: Architecture Linked

Exhibition: Transport by Marc Newson at Gagosian Gallery

Transport,” a thematic exhibition by Marc Newson at Gagosian Gallery, that brings together for the first time all of his major designs and realized products for transport and human locomotion since 1999.

Situating Aquariva by Marc Newson within the breadth and reach of Newson’s enduring obsession with human and mechanical locomotion, “Transport” explores the full range of his vehicle design. Some have been commissioned by leading international corporations specializing in automotive, aerospace, and nautical design, others designed for pure pleasure. From MN Special (2008), a lightweight carbon fiber bicycle designed for Biomega, to EADS Astrium Space-Plane prototype (2007) designed for commercial space tourism; from the mirror-like Nickel Surfboard (2006) designed for competitive tow-in surfing, to Kelvin40 (2003), a small, idiosyncratic jet plane named after the main character in Tarkovsky’s Solaris and commissioned by Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain; from the “convertible” Zvezdochka trainer for Nike (2004), designed for general use by Russian cosmonauts in the International Space Station and named after the fifth Russian dog in space, to the endearing Ford 021C urban concept car (1999), Newson’s imagination reveals a sense of playfulness and fun behind the requisite rigor of the modern design mind.

Newson approaches design as an experimental exercise in extreme structure and advanced technologies, combined with a highly tactile and exacting exploration of materials, processes, and skills. As an industrial designer, his reach is broad and diverse, from concept jets and cars to watches, footwear, jewelry, restaurants, and aircraft interiors. Since the outset of his career, he has also produced beautifully crafted, limited-edition furniture, including the iconic Lockheed Lounge (1986). In a world where the distinctions between art and design are becoming increasingly blurred Newson is a trailblazer, having pursued parallel activities in exclusive and mass production for more than twenty years.

As a kid obsessed with designing and making things, post-war Italian design was a huge source of inspiration. I was amazed by the seamless ability of designers and industry to produce every conceivable type of industrial product, from furniture to automobiles. My own career has undoubtedly been influenced by the Italians’ impact on so many areas of design.
Marc Newson

Transport, by Marc Newson, September 14 – October 16, at Gagosian Gallery, New York

Exhibition: Bucky Fuller & Spaceship Earth

Three-quarters of a century after the last of the original models, Car #3, rolled off the production line, a new Dymaxion Car has been created, Car #4. Based on the drawings of Car #3 and painstaking analysis of Car #2, it was built in the English countryside in the East Sussex workshops of Crosthwaite & Gardiner, which specializes in restoring 1930s racing cars. The new car was commissioned by Norman Foster, the British architect of such modern landmarks as Beijing Airport, the new Reichstag in Berlin and the “Gherkin” in London. A passionate car collector, he undertook the project as a labor of love and an homage to R. Buckminster Fuller, who he met in 1971 and collaborated with until Fuller’s death in 1983.

Car #4 is now on display in “Bucky Fuller & Spaceship Earth,” an exhibition of Fuller’s work running through Oct. 30 at the Ivorypress Art + Books gallery in Madrid. The story of all four models is told in a new book “Dymaxion Car: Buckminster Fuller” published by Ivorypress, which is owned by Mr. Foster’s wife, Elena Ochoa Foster.

What a story. It begins with Mr. Foster’s moving description of Fuller as “a dear friend — as far as it is possible to be with someone who is also one’s mentor.” Jonathan Glancey, the British architectural critic, then recounts Fuller’s struggle to produce the cars that he envisaged as being but one component of a dazzlingly futuristic “Dymaxion world” for which he also intended to design housing, boats, maps and something sounding startlingly like a hovercraft.

As Mr. Glancey points out, it is a complex, often confusing tale. By 1933, when Fuller opened the Dymaxion Car workshop, he had made his name as a gifted and charismatic, but rambunctious, design maverick who had twice been expelled from Harvard and had started several ill-fated entrepreneurial efforts to manufacture his designs.

To develop the car he collaborated with two nearly as colorful characters. One was W. Starling Burgess, a Harvard dropout who had become a brilliant aviation engineer, yacht designer and poet, but also a womanizer, alcoholic and morphine addict. The other was Nannie Dale Biddle, a wealthy socialite and aviatrix who financed the project until she clashed with Fuller (an occupational hazard for his business partners) and fell for the dashing Burgess, becoming the fourth of his five wives.

Car #1 was built using the chassis frame, gearbox, running gear and V8 engine of a 1932 Ford Tudor sedan. Inspired by science, aviation and nautical design, Fuller and Burgess constructed a long, lean vehicle with two front wheels and one at the rear. The body was built like a boat with an aluminum-coated wooden frame. A fortnight before Car #1 was finished, Fuller told a journalist that it had already “done 100,000 miles” and that 100 more were being made.

This was nonsense, but Car #1 did make a triumphant journey to Manhattan before its fateful crash a few months later just outside Chicago, where it was to debut at the 1933 World’s Fair. It wasn’t to blame, but the tragedy cast a cloud over the Dymaxion project at a time when Car #2 was still under construction.

By the time it was completed in January 1934, Fuller had ousted the Burgesses and was preparing to start work on Car #3. He refined the design of each model and, though none of the three was quite as fast or fuel-efficient as he boasted, they could be driven for 35 miles a gallon, twice as far as a typical car of the time. The Dymaxion Car was also, as Mr. Foster puts it: “So visually seductive that you want to own it, to have the voluptuous physicality of it in your garage.”

Exhibition: Bucky Fuller & Spaceship Earth, Dymaxion Car #4, by R. Buckminster Fuller, September 1 to October 30, at Ivorypress Art + Books, Madrid, Spain
via: The New York Times

New Swiss Design by Atelier Pfister

“Radicals by rock-solid quality craftsmanship and durable design” – that is the motto of the new furniture line Atelier Pfister. Accompanied by world-renowned designer Alfredo Häberli eleven young Swiss designers develop the brand a completely new collection. Among the emerging designers are also those that are already well known, including, for example, Jörg Boner. For the line, Atelier Pfister will make approximately 50 new products in the areas of eating, sleeping, living and working. The collection will be available in the autumn exclusively for Atelier Pfister.

Neues Schweizer Design (New Swiss Design), by Pfister

Exhibtion: Objects and Projects – Alessi

One of the really great figures of design – Alessandro Mendini – is curating and designing a retrospective of the last 30 years of Italian design specially for Die Neue Sammlung. Mendini focuses his exhibition on a key player in the design world: the Alessi company, which has very successfully morphed from a small metal-working firm into a creative factory in the field of design with global operations. Not only with its products but above all through its influential ideas, actions and meta projects Alessi wrote European design history and provided inspiration for reflections on the future of design.

Objects and Projects – Alessi: History and Future of an Italian Design Factory, May 22 – September 19, Die Neue Sammlung Museum, Munich, Germany

Shape & Form Wallpaper from Graham & Brown

Shape & Form was inspired by architecture and the textures and shapes that surround everyday life. The wallpapers feature geometric shapes, optical illusions, and natural forms which explore the ways light and shadow affect perceptions. Graham & Brown has created a unique collection that fuses simple designs with complex techniques; including high gloss, metallic sheens and fine tones that embellish and conjure optical effects.

Shape & Form Wallpaper, by Graham & Brown

Kulango Pounder Spoon at Sotheby’s Auction

The recent Oceanic and African Art Auction at Sotheby’s in Paris included this Kulango Pounder Spoon from Côte d’Ivoire.

Kulango Pounder Spoon, Hammer Price: € 78,750, Oceanic and African Art Auction,
Sale PF1017, Sotheby’s, Paris

Editor's Picks

Bell Side Table
Hand-blown in the traditional manner using a wooden mould, the transparent tinted glass base asserts a sculptural presence in space, contrasting intriguingly with the solid brass frame on top while also forming with it a harmonious unit recalling the elegant curving silhouette of a bell. [more...]

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The Story of Eames Furniture
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The Guggenheim: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Making of the Modern Museum
First-ever book to explore the process behind one of the greatest modern buildings in America. [more...]
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MoonFire: The Epic Journey of Apollo 11
A unique tribute to the defining scientific mission of our time, the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing. [more...]
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Cars Freedom Style Sex Power Motion Colour Everything

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Diz Armchair by Sergio Rodrigues
Handcrafted from solid eucalyptus this Brazilian classic is designed with soothing smooth edges, making it one of the most comfortable and laid-back lounge chairs around. [more...]

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Loblolly House
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Marcel Wanders
Behind the Ceiling is the first monograph on one of the most influential, prolific and celebrated international designers today. [more...]
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How to Wrap Five Eggs
A mid-60s classic of Japanese design. Stunningly laid-out paean to traditional Japanese packaging is rife with sumptuous black and white photos of all manner of boxes, wrappers and containers that appear at once homely and sophisticated, ingeniously utilitarian yet fine and rare. [more...]
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