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Exhibtion: Motoi Yamamoto Labyrinth at Reliefs

Labyrinth, by Motoi Yamamoto, Salt, 3.2 x 11m, Exhibition: Reliefs, 12 January – 26 February, at Fondation Espace Ecureuil , France

Icon: Essence Glasses by Alfredo Häberli for Iittala

Essence Glass Alfredo Häberli Iittala

Essence Glass Alfredo Häberli Iittala

Essence Glass Alfredo Häberli Iittala

Possibly the most beautiful glassware ever designed–Alfredo Häberli has created supremely elegant modern glassware for Iittala. He suggested a new series of glasses and a carafe with one essential idea: have as few glasses as possible, while still being able to serve a full range of fine wines and other drinks.

Häberli says that he always designs his objects for a specific person. When he designed the Iittala Essence glasses, he kept thinking about a friend who is a wine expert. “I went to dinner with him. I wondered how someone with the latest model mobile phone, an expensive watch, a modern car and clothing, could hold an ugly old wine glass. As I was designing the glasses I thought that this must be something that he will like.”

“My personal heritage was essential for this project. Knowing the gastronomic business well (restaurant & hotel in my family), my aim was to integrate this knowledge in a modern shape. Not losing the scientific functionality of a shape in relation to the liquid. The idea for the glass range was to create a balance between tradition and modernity, between celebration and daily use, a balance with one and different uses. In a way, I tried to find the essence in-between. The shape was a challenge for production. The most difficult detail was the stem going into the completely flat bottom plate. This detail with the trapeze shape of the bowl gives the unusual character of the glasses. The water glass is without a stem and can be used as a shot glass or table wine glass in a daily function.”
- Alfredo Häberli

Iittala Essence Glassware, by Alfredo Häberli

Exhibition: Cubics Jan Slothouber + William Graatsma

After an architectural training Jan Slothouber (1918 – 2007) and William Graatsma (1925) worked as architects / designers from 1955 for the Dutch State Mines (DSM). Here they designed the packing, product applications, advertisements and exhibitions and gave the company a recognizable face. Within the information service of DSM the two had an unique position: they could build their own world and developed the principle of cubic constructions. The cubic as a main point brought restriction but also clearity in the multiplicity of possibilities according to Slothouber and Graatsma. The use of several materials adds each time new aspects to the functioning of the cubic constructions.

With their work Slothouber and Graatsma had a clear social intention. The designers considered themselves in fact as ‘ anonymous ‘ discoverers of the many applications of cubics. In democratic passing these possibilities, in which the useful construction exceeds the personal, artistic claim, lies the meaning of their activities. On one hand their working method was entirely new, on the other hand it had been linked with an old idealistic tradition, which propagated an important role for art and design in society.

Cubics Jan Slothouber + William Graatsma, January 9 – February 27, at Vivid Gallery, Rotterdam, Netherlands

Exhibition: dancing squares by nendo

We assembled square planes to create a sense of motion in this series of objects. One part of the bookshelf is frozen in its cascade of tumbling shelves, creating variety in the way books can be stacked. The stool’s twist endows it with visual play. Lamps roll about but are stable, thank to their planes, and cast light in different directions. The table leans as though falling away, but maintains its function as a table, and makes objects placed on it seem to sink into its folds and sways. The different ‘movements’make balance and unbalance overlap, as though we are watching the planes themselves dance.

Exhibition: dancing squares, by nendo, January 13th – 16, Art Stage, Singapore, Photography by Masayuki Hayashi

Gravity is a Force to be Reckoned With by Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle

Madrid-born artist Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle’s latest work, Gravity is a Force to be Reckoned With, realizes one of Mies van der Rohe’s unbuilt projects–albeit upside-down. The installation is an inverted, replica of Mies’ 50×50 House project from 1951. The small, house is completely enclosed in glass, with black leather Barcelona chairs, glass-topped tables, and a wood partition, containing a kitchen with a small range, countertop and a French Press with a teaspoon.

Gravity is a Force to be Reckoned With, by Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle

Exhibition: Soviet Constructivism at ALVA

Recent graduates of the University of Western Australia have exhibited recent work, Soviet Constructivism. Each student selects a building which encapsulates a significant theoretical position in architectural history. In 2010 the Soviet Avant Garde of constructivism was picked as the epoch of exploration. A model of the chosen example will be made to an agreed scale, which will be accompanied by a written paper of not more than 2000 words. The written component is to be a critical analysis of the treatise or manifesto from which the built form is derived. The critical analysis also serves as a reference point for the realization of three dimensional forms of models.

Exhibition: Soviet Constructivism, The University of Western Australia Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Visual Arts (ALVA).
via: designboom

Exhibition: Sunny Memories

Sunny Memories is the fusion of solar technology and industrial design. A project that involved more than 80 students from four leading design schools, this exhibit explores the broad new realm of technology, energy, and design that solar dye cells have heralded. Led by the EPFL+ECAL Lab, in Lausanne, Switzerland, the “Sunny Memories” workshops took place in collaboration with the University of Art and Design Lausanne (ECAL), the California College of the Arts (CCA), the Royal College of Art in London (RCA) and the Ecole Nationale Superieure de Creation Industrielle in Paris (ENSCI). Under the tutelage of design leaders like Yves Behar from San Francisco’s fuseproject, Jean-Francois Dingjian of Paris’ Normal Studio, Sam Hecht from London’s Industrial Facility, and Swiss designer Jörg Boner, students began their projects with the following challenge: how do we use energy to record our memory, heritage and knowledge? How can we employ solar energy to preserve history, while increasing autonomy, mobility, and sustainability?

The source of this solar innovation is the EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne), the “MIT of Switzerland.” There, professor Michael Graëtzel began to use molecules from colorants to transform the sun’s light into electricity. Inspired by photosynthesis, he developed an award-winning technology that allowed solar dye cells to take all sorts of shapes, colors and forms. As industrial production of these solar cells has begun, it is now up to the design community to create products that meld this new technology with great design. Sunny Memories signals a new relationship between technology and design: designers have the freedom to explore the multiple meanings that a new technology can bring about.

Sunny Memories, with the Embassy of Switzerland, January 18 – February 8, Washington Design Center, Washington D.C.

Exhibition: Photographs by Ezra Stoller

Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright, Bear Run, PA, 1971, Gelatin Silver Print
© Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

General Motors Technical Center, Eero Saarinen, Warren, MI, 1950, Gelatin Silver Print
© Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Guggenheim Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright, New York, NY, 1959, Gelatin Silver Print
© Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Johnson Wax Tower, Frank Lloyd Wright, Racine, WI, 1950, Gelatin Silver Print
© Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson, New York, NY, 1958, Gelatin Silver Print, © Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson, New York, NY, 1958, Gelatin Silver Print, © Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Manufacturer’s Trust Company, Fifth Avenue, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, New York, NY, 1954, Gelatin Silver Print, © Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

TWA Terminal at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport, Eero Saarinen, New York, NY, 1962, Gelatin Silver Print, © Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

TWA Terminal at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport, Eero Saarinen, New York, NY, 1962, Gelatin Silver Print, © Ezra Stoller, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Chicago born photographer, Ezra Stoller’s (1915–2004) gelatin silver prints include images of architectural interiors and iconic landmarks. Based on his background in architecture and industrial design, Stoller used a large-format camera to photograph monumental 20th century buildings, including the Guggenheim Museum, the TWA terminal at Idlewild Airport (now John F. Kennedy International Airport), the Seagram Building, the Salk Institute, Yale Art and Architecture Building and Fallingwater. In addition to well-known photographs of these locations, the exhibition will include lesser-known photographs of small homes and guest houses which provide a fresh look at the masterful eye that established Stoller as the preeminent photographer of modern architecture.

A pioneer in the field of architectural photography, Ezra Stoller was commissioned by architects such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Paul Rudolph, Eero Saarinen, I.M. Pei, Marcel Breuer and Richard Meier, because of his unique ability to capture the building according to the architect’s vision and to lock it into the architectural canon. His photographs convey a three-dimensional experience of architectural space through a two-dimensional medium, with careful attention to vantage point and lighting conditions, as well as to line, color, form and texture.

Exhibition: Photographs by Ezra Stoller, January 6 to February 12, Yossi Milo Gallery, New York, USA

Exhibition: The Fourth Wall

Initiated by N°111 with François Bauchet and Eric Jourdan, the Quatrième Mur was one of the ‘off’ exhibitions which spearheaded the event during the St Etienne Design Biennial 2010. In a former cinema and with this mysterious title, three ex- Saint Etienne students invited two of their ex-lecturers for a collective exhibition in the shape of ‘tribute-thanks-transmission’ with a result which lecturers and pupils alike can be proud of. The installation comprised everyday objects which, through their design and varying scales, gave rhythm and composition to the scenic space. The objective was to encourage the spectator to observe the objects from our domestic environment from a different angle and to reconsider the relationship between objects.

The Fourth Wall by François Bauchet, Eric Jourdan and N°111 , St Etienne Design Biennial

Bent Wood Objects by Matthias Pliessnig

Tripudio Bestia

Insum Itineris

Occupo Orbis

Matthias Pliessnig creates objects made from steam bent white oak, sometimes oxidized or blackened with tar.

Tripudio Bestia, Insum Itineris, Occupo Orbis, by Matthias Pliessnig

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