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Art Warehouse by Powerhouse Company

Next to Schiphol, Amsterdam’s international airport, Powerhouse Company designed Art Warehouse, a new space that combines art storage, meeting rooms and exhibition space. LiNK Art Company is an art consultancy for businesses, institutions and individual clients, providing a wide range of art services. Together with Studio Rublek – architectural light designers – they asked for a new space that is efficient in storing art and also serves as a maximized showcase for guests. The paradox of efficiency and beauty is solved by creating a grid based on shelving systems and placing a modern pavilion in the center of the space. The ground level handles all logistics and situates the storage facility. This specially designed depot fulfills the highest standards for art care, maintenance and storage. The walls of the pavilion are used to exhibit a selection of the available art pieces. Different lighting fixtures, from Studio Rublek, illuminate the art. The walls also create two meeting rooms in the heart of the pavilion. These meeting rooms can be divided and closed off with sliding doors integrated in the walls. The first floor, with its mirror glass outer edge, serves as a terrace in the space. This terrace provides an extension of the exhibition space where special pieces – like design furniture and contemporary sculptures – can be exhibited. The space also gives a panoramic overview of the currently stored art. With all these different spaces and functions, Art Warehouse is a multifunctional framework for meetings, exhibitions, art storage and light design in an existing warehouse building.

Art Warehouse, Schiphol, The Netherlands, by Powerhouse Company
Photography by Christian van der Kooy

Espace St-Denis by Anne Sophie Goneau

The project is the design of a 1,280 sq.ft. condo, located on the ground floor of a triplex in Montreal. The mandate was to divide each living area in order to maximize while maintaining the architectural integrity of the existing location, each room with natural light. The concept was to highlight the raw materials, discovered during the demolition (brick wall, wall hemlock and steel structure), in order to communicate their material, their relief and color environment.

Upon entering the hall is semi-closed hall, so that it has an overview of the condo. The open kitchen is the focal point of the space; it unfolds on the dining room and living room, where the master bedroom fits. It is bounded by a glass wall which preserves the view of the bare brick; an archaeological reminder wanting to highlight the existing raw materials as an exhibitor showcase. A green velvet sofa, two vintage chairs and a bookshelf that leans against the bedroom wall bound the living room.

On the ground, a radiant hot water heating system was installed under a concrete slab which was covered by a light gray epoxy and polyurethane matt finish to replicate the natural color of concrete. The primary and secondary bedrooms, as well as the bathroom, are glossy white epoxy to distinguish the private area of the common space. The steel beam, flameproof, delimits the passage area. In the corridor leading to the bathroom, a light-emitting diode was installed in the recessed ceiling for a more intimate setting, which features the original hemlock wall.

Tone on tone, glossy black kitchen cabinets and electrical appliances are blended. The cooktop with integrated sub-hood, allows maximum exposure of brick wall, the backsplash, lit by a light-emitting diode recessed in counter. The dining table becomes the visual continuity of the kitchen island. In the bathroom, custom-made stainless steel countertop and bath rectilinear shapes are stacked on each other, forming a sculptural composition. On the floor, a white epoxy and in the shower a dark grey epoxy were applied. The contrast between these two colors form a psychological boundary of two areas: one is clear and bright, the other, darker, creating a private area for the shower and toilet. The window allows natural light in the room while preserving the intimacy of the space, with a frosted film.

Espace St-Denis, Montreal, Canada, by Anne Sophie Goneau

McCann Offices by Design Research Studio

The McCann Erickson Headquarters in New York. It’s the first corporate headquarters undertaken by Design Research Studio, the interior and architectural division of Tom Dixon, alongside US architectural firm Gensler.

McCann Offices, New York, by Design Research Studio

Stuart Weitzman Flagship Store by Zaha Hadid

The Milan flagship is fluid and playful. A dialogue of geometry and materiality creates an enchanting rhythm of folds and recesses further shaped by functional and ergonomic considerations. Modular display units showcase shoes and also provide seating, while a seamless integration of diverse forms invites our curiosity. The juxtaposition of these distinct elements of the design defines the different areas of the store. Rooted in a palette of subtle monochromatic shades, Zaha Hadid created an interior landscape of discovery centred on two separate zones to enhance the relationship between the customer and the collection.

Experimentation with materials and construction technologies further define the unique space. The curved modular seating and freestanding display elements have been constructed from fibreglass dipped in rose gold – a technique similar to that used in boat manufacturing. Also, the glass-reinforced concrete (GRC) of the store’s walls and ceiling expresses solidity whilst at the same time the delicate precision of complex curvatures focus on special areas for display.

Stuart Weitzman Flagship Store, Milan, Italy, by Zaha Hadid

Bitterli House by Roger Stüssi

Bitterli House, Zurich, Switzerland, by Roger Stüssi, Photography © Bruno Helbling

Villa Oppenheim by Pott Architects

Situated in Heringsdorf, a spa on the island of Usedom, Villa Oppenheim is one of the finest examples of the historic spa architecture of the German Baltic. We have renovated the villa at the front of the main promenade of the popular resort on the basis of its original design, restoring it to its original use as an exclusive, private holiday residence. To create a house as a unified whole, Pott Architects also took on the custom-made interior design of the villa. This included the design of kitchens and baths, even an in-house wellness area, down to the furniture and every last detail. We have succeeded in maintaining the character of the house while adding new elements to create a modern appearance. The result is a shining example of a 21st century spa in the lovely setting of the Usedom holiday resort.

Villa Oppenheim, Usedom, Germany, by Pott Architects
Photography © Sebastian Treytnar, KLAFS

Kabinett by Septembre

The conversion of a former manufacturing workshop in a Parisian alley to a family apartment. Multifunctional wooden cabinetry lines the perimeter of the space to open up the central living area.

Kabinett, Paris, by Septembre, Photography by Maris Mezulis

North Delegates’ Lounge by Hella Jongerius & Rem Koolhaas

The North Delegates’ Lounge inside the United Nations was designed as a place for informal meetings. The casual setting was furnished by leading designers of the time including Hans Wegner, Peter Hvidt, Jacob Kjaer, and Nanna Ditzel. The interior was the pinnacle of postwar / modern design splendor reflective of the era. It was refined, clean and handsome. But decades of wear and tear not to mention various additions tarnished its luster. Enter Rem Koolhaus and Hella Jongerius. The Dutch masters were selected to redesign the lounge as part of UN’s nearly $2 billion plan to renovate the entire building. Artworks and some of the lighting and furnishings were preserved but for the most part, Jongerius transformed the lounge into a colorful, casual, and dare we say fun environment. The renovation and redesign was a gift from the Netherlands to the UN.

Redesign of the North Delegates’ Lounge, United Nations, New York, by Hella Jongerius and Rem Koolhaas, Photography © Frank Oudeman

Atrium Champagne Bar by Foster + Partners

Winners of the 2013 Restaurant & Bar Design Awards have been announced. Norman Foster’s Atrium Champagne Bar in London won for Best Bar.

Atrium Champagne Bar, London, by Foster + Partners, Overall Winner 2013 Restaurant & Bar Design Awards

Strick House by Oscar Niemeyer ll

Connoisseurs architecture of the middle of the twentieth century, Michael and Gabrielle Boyd discovered a forgotten masterpiece of Oscar Niemeyer and brought him back to life.

Strick House, Santa Monica, California, USA, by Oscar Niemeyer
via: Architectural Digest

Read More: Strick House by Oscar Niemeyer I

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