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Maranhão Apartment by Flavio Castro

The biggest challenge was the conversion of a family apartment compartmented into an apartment for a young single advertiser, and retrofitting existing securities repaginating brought from other apartment. The meticulous work respected the memories impregnated in certain parts and introduced new elements from the new intentions. The living room, tv room and kitchen have become part of a single space through the demolition of walls and removal of the toilet.

Shelves specifically emphasize the horizontality of the space and serve as a shield for design pieces. A large gallery Corten steel is the element delimiter between social and intimate, camouflaging access that is done through a pivoting door. The original structure was exposed and the materials are shown with sincerity. The concrete, glass and steel corten combine a sober color palette and contrast with some pieces that give identity to the flexible space.

Maranhão Apartment, São Paulo, Brazil, by Flavio Castro
Photography by Pedro Kok

Case Meallin Office by Mim Design

Located in Hawthorn, this wide, open-planned office space and reception occupies 250sqm. The composition of this office space required innovative thinking and clever design solutions to make it practical whilst remaining simple, clean and light-filled. As a prominent Project and Development Management consultancy group, the interior acknowledges the client Case Meallin’s respect for professionalism, planning and efficiency. Applying a grounding palette of charcoal and white, these blues feature in the custom floor covering and as geometric graphics in both the kitchen splashback and office glazing, which creates visual intrigue without playing to short-term trends.

Floor to ceiling natural oak timber screens generate a sense of large scale proportion whilst highlighting the divisions, providing privacy and distinguishing staff zoning between spaces. Throughout the office, efficient planning and clean architectural lines ensure spaces are light-filled and well-proportioned, whilst maintaining a fluidity from one space to the next.

Case Meallin Office, Melbourne, Australia, by Mim Design
Photography by Peter Clarke

Roderick Vos Studio Showroom

Dutch design office Roderick Vos Studio has recently opened a new showroom in the town of ‘s Hertogenbosch (also called Den Bosch for short) in The Netherlands, which reflects its designers’ convictions and philosophy about what design should (or should not) be. Founded in 1990 by designers and partners in life Roderick Vos and Claire Teeuwen, the studio specialises in innovative interior solutions and product designs for the home. With collaborations with companies such as Alessi, Driade and Moooi, products on display include iconic design pieces such as the modular Dresser Montigny, the almost poetic Kiyo faucet and the organic Atlantis bowl. More recent projects at the Roderick Vos Studio include the hybrid Bucketlight (cast-aluminium pots with live plants hung from the ceiling, double-functioning as lighting) and the interior design for the eat-in kitchen of hotel Château de la Resle in Burgundy, France.

Roderick Vos’ philosophy as a designer is simple and concise: ”Good design should be self-explanatory,” in other words, a design object should not require intellectual and conceptual explanations in order to be appreciated, used and enjoyed. For Roderick Vos, art and design are two different beasts, with the latter being in the service of everyday life, utility and efficiency. A firm believer in the disarming power of simplicity and beauty, he strives towards creating objects that make the people who use them happy, placing more emphasis on the emotional impact of a product. Like a researcher armed with a child-like curiosity and eagerness for experimentation and play, he seeks new ideas in the factories and workshops where his products are manufactured, drawing inspiration from getting to know different materials, crafting techniques and the craftspeople themselves.

The New Showroom, In Den Bosch, The Netherlands, of Roderick Vos Studio
Photography by Rene van der Hulst, via: Yatzer

Invisible Kitchen by i29 Interior Architects

As living spaces and kitchen islands merge together in most contemporary homes nowadays, i29 designed a kitchen that acts more as a piece of furniture instead of as a kitchen. Our aim was to develop a kitchen system that seems to disappear in space. The design is reduced to it’s absolute minimum, having a top surface of only a couple of centimeters thickness with all water, cooking and electrical connections included. Large sliding wall panels conceal all kitchen appliances and storage space. In the case of this apartment in Paris, where the kitchen concept is installed, an existing profiled wall is exactly copied on the front panels in order to integrate the solid volume with the monumental space. The freestanding kitchen island is placed in front of the panelled sliding doors.

Invisible Kitchen, by i29 Interior Architects

Hugh Kaptur: Pieterhaus Remodel by Modernous

This 1960’s Hugh Kaptur ranch house was in quite a state of disrepair when it was purchased as a foreclosure. It had been “remuddled” several times, featuring electrical wiring run on the outside of walls, awkward closets added in every room, and poor design choices highlighted throughout. It was stripped of all finishes and some minor layout work was implemented. It was restored to its mid-century glory with modern, but period-appropriate, finishes and materials. Furnishings are a mix of vintage and new, mostly sourced from eBay and local Palm Springs vintage boutiques. It’s intended use as a vacation home provided some extra latitude for whimsy and use of color. The original architect came to view the home at the end of the project and was highly complimentary.

Pieterhaus, by Hugh Kaptur, Palm Springs, Design by Modernous
Photography by Dan Chavkin

Apartment at Turin by Andrea Marcante, Adelaide Testa

An apartment built on the mezzanine level of a building overlooking the square that symbolises the city of Turin, Piazza San Carlo erected by the Dukes of Savoy and in particular Maria Cristina di Francia, who reigned as “Madama Reale” during the first half of the 17th century, turns into a modern-day theatre representing a certain idea of the bourgeois home, the home of the Turin professional middle classes, through its spaces and the furniture inside it, all embodying reassuring engineering precision and subtle concerns.

The building plan, characterised by a tunnel-shaped progression from the rear to the drawing room facing the square, the windows opening onto the square itself with their given shape and size of the “oculus” on the building facades marking the perimeter, and the need to set out the relational spaces in the living quarters as zones and premises that (to a greater or lesser degree) can be seen from outside, provide the initial input for the construction of a vaguely metaphysical home environment.

Apartment at Turin, Italy, by Andrea Marcante & Adelaide Testa
Photography by Carola Ripamonti

Nuon Office by NEYLIGERS Design+Projects

Nuon Office, Amsterdam, Netherlands, by NEYLIGERS Design+Projects, Photography by Rick Geenjaar (Procore)

Okko Hotel by Patrick Norguet

“Okko hotel is, first and foremost, the story of my encounter with Olivier Devys, the project’s founder. Starting with a blank page, we combined our visions and our determination to take up the challenge of upending traditional practices in the hospitality industry to create a bold and innovative concept, an all-included package for the best location, best service and best price! Thus was born the idea of a contemporary and urban four-star hotel where the human, design, and innovation are at the heart of the project. I designed an adequate, simple, and timeless product around this “Okko spirit” to cater to customers’ new needs: a place unaffected by time or trends and where the notions of service and comfort are essential; to be able to work, dine, relax, be waited on or use anything freely, any time of the day; to feel like being home away from home. The high-end amenities and services in the modern and relaxing Okko room and in the vast and convivial Club room make the Okko hotel a unique place that combines aesthetics and comfort. I wanted to create a brand, not just a hotel!”

Okko Hotel, Nantes, France, by Patrick Norguet

Casa Cubo by Isay Weinfeld

Casa Cubo, the initiative of a couple of art collectors, was conceived to house a lodging and support center to artists and the development of the arts, but with all necessary facilities to serve as a home. The program was solved within a cubic block, split vertically into three levels and a mezzanine, whose façades are treated graphically as a combination of lines defined by the cladding cement plaques, by the glass strip on the mezzanine, and the striped wood composition that changes as the bedroom windows are opened and closed.

The service nucleus is located at the front of the ground level, comprising a kitchen, a restroom, a dining room and an entrance hall giving way to the wide room with double ceiling height and polished concrete floor, intended to host events, exhibitions or even work as a lounge that opens onto the backyard.

The mezzanine of the lounge, standing on the slab topping the service nucleus on the ground floor, houses the library, which is marked by three strong elements: a shelving unit extending the whole back wall, a strip of fixed glass next to the floor and a spiral staircase covered in wood that leads to the private quarters upstairs.

Private quarters consist of 3 bedrooms and a living room thoroughly lit through a floor-to-ceiling opening. The garage and service areas are located in the basement.

Casa Cubo, São Paulo, Brazil, by Isay Weinfeld
Photography © Fernando Guerra, FG+SG Architectural Photography

Private Apartment by Joseph Dirand

Private Apartment, Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Paris, France, by Joseph Dirand
via: Architectural Digest, Photography © Adrien Dirand

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