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Pullman Tour Eiffel by Mathieu Lehanneur

Pullman Tour Eiffel just opened with the second sample of Mathieu Lehanneur’s “Business Playground” concept: reinvention of the meeting room as a perfect illustration of the “blurring” of private and professional life. This room reflects the brand’s “Work hard, Play hard” motto as well as its guests’ lifestyle. It combines performance and pleasure with a fresh take on the traditional aspects of a meeting: a meeting table designed like a poker table, a private area for informal conversations or breaks, and a cabinet of curiosities. All these features are designed to stimulate creativity and reinvent international hospitality codes. After the success of first Playground at Pullman London St Pancras, the concept is gradually rolled out across the 80 Pullman’s hotels network.

“Poker Table” The table is a key element in a small gathering like a board meeting. In the “Business Playground” room, the central table is given an additional dimension. Mathieu Lehanneur has reinterpreted it as a poker table which notably features a leather edge. This table is designed to make people want to participate in the meeting, just as they would want to engage in a game, they want to take part, be a player and stay constantly focused.

“Canopy Break” During a meeting day, it is important to have relaxing moments and less formal exchanges between the intensive work sessions. To allow participants to escape or opt for a different meeting setting, a dedicated bubble-like space has been created. The Pullman “Canopy Break”, allows participants to relax comfortably and take an organic break or have an informal conversation.

Mathieu Lehanneur explains: “Between two meetings, the Pullman “Canopy Break” provides an escape route that is both organic and digital. Designed to offer a pause but also as an informal extension of the meeting, the Pullman “Canopy Break” is somewhere else, outside, under the trees.”. At last, an object for imaginary travel, but also for growth strategy, Mathieu Lehanneur has designed a giant globe. The entirely white “Earth Ball,” revealing countries and continents through its simple relief, seems in equilibrium, ready to roll at any moment. Through this object/sculpture, the “Work hard, Play Hard” motto is embodied here more than ever. Pullman has furthermore made it an iconic object by placing it in each of its lobbies worldwide.

Business playground for Pullman Tour Eiffel, by Mathieu Lehanneur
Photography by Felipe Ribon

Room 506 by Jaime Hayon for Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

Jaime Hayon reveals a total design for Room 506 at the iconic SAS Royal Hotel (now Radisson Blu Royal Hotel Copenhagen). In 1958, Arne Jacobsen designed a room in this hotel – Room 606 – which is still preserved to this day. Both designers are known as rare multi-talented artists with the ability and the courage to create designs on any scale. Hayon’s total design of the room that includes furniture, works of art, bedspreads, lamps etc.has a playful expression, with passion for organic shapes, exclusive materials, extraordinary craftsmanship and a clear aesthetic expression.

“In our past six years’ collaboration, I think we have achieved a great evolution for the Fritz Hansen brand but also a great evolution in my own work, moving forward my design with the idea of making the most of minimum means. Coming from the Mediterranean, to be able to make an imprint on Danish design has been an incredibly special experience for me. The idea for this room is to create a luminous space that brings joy and genuine comfort through the Fritz Hansen designs along with some of my own designs and art. Together with Fritz Hansen, I have created bespoke designs just for this room, always in reflection of our shared principles of working with the best materials and aiming for simplicity and maximum comfort,” says Hayon.

Room 506, by Jaime Hayon, for Raddison Blu Royal Hotel

Garage in a Living Space by i29 Interior Architects

A formerly garage space in Amsterdam’s area de Pijp, turned into a spacious house naturally lit by large roof lights. The interior with a generous 230m2 on one floor level is finished in a simple material palette. The repetition of rectangular rough oak wooden surfaces is in great contrast with the stark white walls, black surfaces and grey cast flooring. The custom designed kitchen includes a large wooden sliding door to cover integrated storage areas, with a contrasting black cooking island in front. Built-in cabinets and a fireplace have the same characteristics and contrast in materials. Wooden walls from top to bottom with built-in doors are marking the entrance to the more private areas such as bed and bathrooms. Outdoors is a patio in between the living and master bedroom. In order to connect inside and out, i29 interior architects designed a 20 m2 hand knotted carpet with a natural mossy pattern. The excess of natural light in combination with the soft layer of green and beige resembles the outdoor experience while being inside.

Garage in a Living Space, Amsterdam, Netherlands by i29 Interior Architects

OKKO Hotel Grenoble by Patrick Norguet

The second OKKO hotel has taken up residence in the heart of Grenoble and its eco-district. With a terrace facing magnificent mountains, the challenge was to come up with a flattering echo for these beautiful rivals. A new range of warm colors is arranged in islands to give structure to the large volumes of the Club. Very contemporary evocations of nature were achieved with a choice of high performance materials and a collection of furniture pieces that hinge on the fundamental concepts of the OKKO ethos. Neither quite the same as the first OKKO nor quite different from it, this unique place combines aesthetics, comfort, timelessness and high standards. To continue to feel at home while being somewhere else. Okko hotels had been founded by Paul Dubrule and Olivier Devys.

OKKO hotels, Grenoble, France, by Patrick Norguet
Photography by Jérôme Galland

Apartamento Sergipe by Felipe Hess

The Brazilian architecture firm of Felipe Hess has designed this bright and spacious apartment located in a 1960’s modernist building in São Paulo for its owner, a young actor who lives alone. With the brief calling for a spacious, open and clean-cut space, the designers decided to tear down almost every wall and unify all social areas. One of its unique features is a 10-meter-long table that runs along one side of the loft-like space, serving different purposes at different points (functioning as a cooking table and office desk with inlaid power plugs and dining table). The apartment’s private areas, comprising a master bedroom with bathroom and closet and a small toilet for visitors, are separated by a large white wall. Reflecting the owner’s occupation, a special area has been created opposite the kitchen for rehearsing plays, simply furnished with a few chairs and amply lit with natural light.

Another feature of the apartment is its main entrance which has been placed inside a cube construction, that is completely covered in bright yellow tiles from floor to ceiling. In order to create a seamless surface of tiles, the designers decided not to use a door handle; instead, you open the door in true 1960′s James Bond style by entering a PIN on a number-pad hidden behind one of the tiles. As the entrance cube is covered with shelves from the outside, an illusion is created – as upon entering, it seems like you are coming out of a magic door through the bookcase.

Apartamento Sergipe, São Paulo, Brazil, by Felipe Hess
Photography by Ricardo Bassetti

Finefood by Note Design Studio and Lerch

For this interior they were inspired by a beautiful photo series of the misty Death Valley by Jordan Sullivan, capturing the subtle variation and soft color changes of daylight that turns the harsh landscape into a poetic, inspiring place. The Finefood restaurant and coffee shop serves well cooked everyday food and pastries for the inhabitants of Hammarby Sjöstad in the south of Stockholm. One of the challenges designing the place is the fact it being a mix of a café, lunch restaurant and bistro. It must work just as well serving breakfast at 7am in the morning as serving beer 7pm in the evening.

As a Swedish design studio leaning on our minimalistic heritage, they created a clean, soft space with a calm, inviting color palette. The base of the interior is a custom made herringbone tile floor representing the rich gray scales of rocks and mountains. The color palette – ranging from the deep green marble to various nuances of pale green and turquoise with contrasting salmon red and peach – are a direct translation of the colorful variations of the natural light in the mountains.

The materials are typical Scandinavian such as light ash wood, brass and natural leather except for the Green Guatemala marble used some part of the design. Tables, sofas and shelves are specially designed for this project giving it its own unique identity.

Finefood, Stockholm, Sweden, by Note Design Studio and Lerch
Photography by Note Design Studio

Abbaye de Fontevraud Hotel by Jouin Manku

With hotel conversions in historic sites often ending up being rather soulless, the balance struck between modern-day tastes and needs, as well as history, is just right at the Fontevraud Abbey’s new hotel. The soothing and sleek design leaves room for the historically charged interiors of one of the vastest monastic sites from the Middle Ages, to continue be the focal point of every space. The four-star Hôtel Fontevraud replaces the previous three star hotel (which closed in 2012) situated inside the Abbaye de Fontevraud (founded in 1101 AD). Located in Anjou, France, the UNESCO World Heritage Site was once the burial site of the English King Richard I or ‘Lion Heart’ as he came more famously to be known, which visitors can see today through his recumbent statue, as well as those of other Plantagenet family members, situated in the heart of the abbey.

Abbaye de Fontevraud Hotel, Anjou, France, by Jouin Manku, Photography © Nicolas Mathéus
via: Yatzer

Skyhouse Entry & Stairwell by David Hotson

The private elevator landing opens into a tall vestibule, tapering upward to a seamless rectangular oculus which provides a view of the sculpted summit of the adjacent skyscraper. From the elevator vestibule, the floor slopes gently upward, passing under the twisting shaft of the stairwell to arrive at the main level of the penthouse. The stairwell shaft ascends through the full height of the penthouse, visually linking the entry hall with the structural glass floor of the attic four stories above. The stair itself wraps around the stairwell. The facetted surfaces of the stairwell converge on apertures, trimmed in mirror polished stainless steel, which provide views into and through the stairwell from the surrounding spaces. At the third level a structural glass bridge traverses the stairwell shaft passing through stainless-trimmed openings at either end. The original riveted steel structure – clad in intumescent paint- threads through the faceted stairwell slipping through apertures into adjacent rooms.

Skyhouse Entry & Stairwell, New York, United States, by David Hotson

Hotel Dupanlou by Studio Makkink & Bey

For the project, Studio Makkink & Bey developed a series of spatial installations that transform the historic Hôtel chambers into lively public spaces. Carpets and curtains create rooms within the room. Antique pieces are scattered throughout, reflecting the past, and new furniture by Prooff “inspire and stimulate the functions of today and tomorrow.”

“Invited by the The French Artistic Nationale Commission Makkink & Bey furnished the main room as well as 23 working/meeting rooms of Hôtel Dupanloup by creating eclectic three dimensional collages of furniture; amongst others Prooff Worksofa’s, EarChairs and SideSeats in new colourschemes, a ‘Dupanloup chair- and table’ specially designed for the project, antique pieces of furniture, a special edition of the Tree trunk Bench and re-designs made of Ikea furniture by students of École Supérieure d’Art et de design d’Orléans that participated in a summer workshop with Studio Makkink & Bey.

Carpets and curtains outline the reprogrammed spaces and introduce a new heraldy that narrates about the content of the local archives (such as from the local Fine Art Museum, the Frac Centre and the House of Jeanne d’Arc). The spirits of the past and present are merged and create rich contexts for researchers -and visitors of the International Research Center of the University of Orléans to meet- and work in. Even when not in use these ‘room in a room’ interiors are intriguing spatial still lifes that portray several layers of time, or as Director of Cultural Affair of the Centre Region Sylvie Le Clech describes them; ‘A treasure hunt across centuries’.

Hotel Dupanlou, Orléans, France, by Studio Makkink & Bey
Photography by Ministère de la culture et de la communication / Drac Centre, François Lauginie, Studio Makkink & Bey

Showroom by Dotdotdot

Dotdotdot has designed a showroom in Pont Saint Martin, Val d’Aosta for the Data Center Technology & Operations of Engineering, a leading company in Italy, specialized in software and IT services. This communication-oriented ambience dedicated specifically to the clients illustrates the corporate values, the solutions, the projects and the projects through a demonstrative pathway has been designed to make the invisible visible.

Subdivision of the spaces, furnishing solutions, interactive experiences: in this project for Engineering dotdotdot has exploited, maximized and optimized its know-how in architecture, interiors and interaction design. The hub of the project is the ‘demo’ area where the clients will enjoy a full immersion and interactive experience, thanks to the large table used as a platform for navigating the multi-media contents. This table provides direct feedback on the large curved video-projection wall; this adds a touch of scenographic impact that is transformed into a visual support of the contents.

On entering the showroom, the client immediately becomes the protagonist of the full immersion and communicational experience. The different ambiences, split by function, are part of a single visual identity, expressing the corporate values of innovation, research, internationalization and growth. The space has been designed to be versatile and flexible, to satisfy the different needs of the participants and the varying degree of communication required and the depth of investigation/research applied to the contents. The furnishings have also been designed to guarantee maximum versatility. The materials – full-depth color MDF (medium-dense fibreboard) and the colorways combine to project an overall visual identity that differentiates the spaces according to function.

The objective of the design was to use architectonic choices, the materials and color to explain to the client the study behind the interfaces, the infographs and the communication, with the perception of an ambience that is undeniably avant-garde yet extremely user-friendly.

Showroom, by Dotdotdot, for the Data Center Technology & Operations of Engineering
Photography by Mauro Angelantoni

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