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Icon: Wheat Kings

For over a century, wooden gabled grain elevators, known as Wheat Kings, have defined the Canadian prairies. They are faintly anthropomorphic, with a pointy head, sloping shoulders, and stout torso. But one by one, they are vanishing, going the way of the small-town railroad station and manned lighthouses.

The first grain elevator sprang up alongside the tracks of the newborn Canadian Pacific Railway at Gretna, Manitoba, in 1881-four years before Riel’s Northwest Rebellion. By 1933, close to 6,000 grain elevators dotted Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. These simple and durable railside appurtenances became focal points in prairie social and economic life.
But the consolidation of small farms into mega-farms and the abandonment of railway branch lines spell the end for the traditional elevator. Today’s farmers increasingly ship their grain by long-haul tractor-trailer to regional “high-throughput grain handling centres” where super-efficient, steel and concrete plants each do the work of a dozen old-style elevators.
Fewer than 1,200 prairie cathedrals remain standing, a handful may survive as heritage artifacts. The rest will succumb to demolition crews.

Flickr Set: I Love Grain Elevators

Icon: Lloyds Building by Richard Rogers

One of the best known and most admired buildings in the City of London, the current Lloyd’s building is the eighth home of Lloyd’s in its 300 year history. This icon of modern architecture was designed especially for Lloyd’s, by Richard Rogers Partnership, to a very specific brief of quality, flexibility and presence. The building was built over eight years from 1978 to 1986. Its focal point is the gigantic Underwriting Room on the ground floor, which houses the famous Lutine Bell.

Lloyds of London Building, by Richard Rogers Partnership

Icon: Philippe Starck Salif Juicer for Alessi

The Juicy Salif citrus squeezer is without doubt, Philippe Starck’s best known design. Once the focus of heated debate and criticism for its supposedly impractical design, it is included in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York.
One of the first projects by Starck for Alessi and devised in the second half of the 1980s, the Juicer has a sculptural feel while the grooved aluminum “spider head” neatly funnels juice down to the glass.

It remains unparalleled in its ability to generate discussions about its meaning and design. As well as being the most controversial citrus fruit squeezer of the 20th century, it has also become one of the icons of design of the 1990s, and it continues to be one of the most provocatively intelligent articles in the Alessi catalogue.

Juicy Salif, Citrus Squeezer, by Philippe Starck, for Alessi

Icon: Konstantin Grcic

German designer Konstantin Grcic was born in Munich in 1965. After opening his practice KGID (Konstantin Grcic Industrial Design) in 1990, he very quickly received recognition for his simple, ingenious products. With numerous commissions from the most important names in the design industry, such as Authentics, Flos, iittala, Krups, Magis and Muji, his work has been widely published in several books and design reviews, and has been awarded the prestigious Compasso d’Oro (Milan, 2001) and Nombre d’Or (Paris, 2004), among others.

Grcic describes himself as a mix of German mentality and English education. Following his initial training as a cabinetmaker, from which he retains the hands-on approach and sensitivity to materials of a craftsman, Grcic went on to study contemporary design at the Royal College of Art in London. This formative experience added a new dimension to his fascination with making things. As a result, every one of his products is characterized by his careful research into the history of design and architecture, and his passion for technology and materials. So much so, that Achille Castiglioni, one of the most significant Italian designers of the twentieth century, considered him to be his ‘spiritual heir’.

Books:

The book presents the work of KGID, showcasing a remarkable portfolio of products and design concepts with especially commissioned photographs and original drawings. It also offers a rare insight into his design process by showing the various stages of a product’s development through sketches, models, computer renderings and snapshots at the workshops of KGID and several manufacturers. With texts by Konstantin Grcic, Pierre Doze and Francesca Picchi, and conceived by Florian Böhm and Konstantin Grcic, this is the first publication on one of the most interesting and prolific designers of today.

Monograph: KGID (Konstantin Grcic Industrial Design), Edited by Florian Böhm
Buy it here: Amazon

See more products designed by Vitra

Icon: Bang & Olufsen Beomaster 1900 by Jacob Jensen

The Beomaster 1900 arrived in 1977 as the most stylish Hi-Fi amp/tuner on the planet. This remains an outstanding design of the period. It is a masterpiece of design with its brushed aluminium, detailled illuminated front indicators and of course the mysterious touch sensitive pads.
Jacob Jensen succeeded in a further coup. Not only did he resist the temptation to follow the general trend and stack individual components on top of each other to form a so-called “hi-fi tower”, but he also demonstrated how to counter Japanese firms, who had long since dominated the market with uninspired metal boxes full of buttons and dials.

Beomaster 1900, by Jacob Jensen, for Bang & Olufsen

Icon: Fagus Shoe Factory by Walter Gropius

Widely regarded as one of the pioneering masters of modern architecture, Walter Gropius’s first large building, the Fagus Shoe Factory in Alfred on the Leine in 1911 was materialized due to his connection with Peter Behrens and in cooperation with Adolf Meyer.
The client’s wish for an attractive facade was solved by Gropius in a special way: by means of a projected steel skeleton, which pulled the function of support to the inside, thereby making possible a broad dissolution of the exterior envelope into glass walls; the idea of the ‘curtain wall’ was at this point first expressed in a consistent manner.
— from Udo Kultermann. Architecture in the 20th Century.

Fagus Shoe Factory, 1911, by Walter Gropius with Adolf Meyer.

Icon: Sony TV8-301

The Sony TV8-301 was the world’s first truly portable television. There had been earlier ‘portable’ TV sets, but you needed to be very strong to carry them. When the sets went on sale in 1960, television was still considered a luxury commodity for the average family. For the price, most people considered a large console set more practical than a portable model. In fact, most of the early Sony TV owners were either very rich or eccentric.

TV8-301, by Sony

Icon: Preben Fabricius & Jørgen Kastholm

Fabricius & Kastholm met each other at the School of Interior design, subsequently formed a partnership and together founded an architect’s office in 1961. They specialised in designing furniture and single-family housing. Although they have individually created some interesting designs, it is in partnership that they have achieved their greatest successes. Their furniture is elegant, refined, and designed with an amazing sense of functionality, detail and quality.
Preben Fabricius (left) [1931-1984] He served his apprenticeship as a cabinet maker with master joiner Niels Vodder in 1952, followed by a course at the School of Interior Design. On completing his studies he was employed by architect Ole Hagen.
Jorgen Kastholm, (right) [1931-2007] first trained as a blacksmith, and later as an architect at the school of interior design, he worked for a period of time with Arne Jacobsen, who became an inspiration to him, he later travelled to Beirut, where he designed the local SAS office (Scandinavian Airlines System). Since then Kastholm has had a successful career and received many prizes and awards.

[from top to bottom] Grasshopper ChairFK82 X Chair, FK Lounge Chair, Skater Chair, Scimitar Chair, by Fabricius & Kastholm

Icon: Royal Suite 606 designed by Arne Jacobsen

In the centre of Copenhagen, on the sixth floor of the Royal Hotel, a single room preserves a microcosm of the definitive masterwork of Danish architect and furniture designer Arne Jacobsen. Room 606 is the last surviving interior of the SAS House: an unparalleled example of modern architecture and design, completed in 1960. With the grey, blue-green colours, the wengé wood and a selection of the most representative furniture designed for the hotel, this room takes its visitors to another time and place.

Hotel guests with an interest in design are welcome to visit Room 606, when it is available. Arne Jacobsen designed the famous Egg and Swan chairs for the Royal as well as the lesser known and rare Drop chair. The room features other details like built-in makeup mirrors, radio and intercom system.

Room 606, starting at 1,295.00 DKK per night, by Arne Jacobsen, at Radisson SAS Royal Hotel, Copenhagen, Denmark

Room 606, A survey of the work of architect and furniture designer Arne Jacobsen.
Buy the book: Amazon

Icon: Bang & Olufsen Beogram 4000 by Jacob Jensen

The Beogram 4000, was the world’s first electronically controlled tangential gramophone. In this pioneering concept, the pick-up moved in a straight line towards the centre of the record parallel with – or tangentially in relation to – the groove.
The innovative and extremely stylish record deck was designed by Jacob Jensen who helped shape Bang & Olufsen’s product design with its characteristic use of discrete, clear lines and high functionality. It is a design which has helped manifest B&O’s easily recognisable product identity.
The Beogram 4000 is included in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) New York.

Beogram 4000, 1972, by Jacob Jensen, for Bang & Olufsen

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