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Icon: Stelton Vacuum Jug by Erik Magnussen

The classic Stelton vacuum jug with the unique rocker stopper was introduced in 1977 and the same year awarded the ID-prize by the Danish Society of Industrial Design. Since then it has attracted considerable attention for its functionalistic design.
Designed by Eric Magnussen in 1976, the unique sealing system has made this Danish classic with its tall, slender form world famous. Due to the special tipping mechanism, the Stelton flask opens automatically. The lid closes again, aroma-tight, when put down again.

Stelton Vacuum Jug, by Erik Magnussen, for Stelton

Icon: Tizio lamp

Introduced in 1972 by Artemide, the Tizio lamp represented a breakthrough in more ways than one. The metal arms, which conduct the low-voltage electricity from the transformer in the base to the bulb, are perfectly counterbalanced and can hold in any position. The Tizio incorporated a halogen bulb, one of the first uses of this technology outside the automotive industry. Favoured by architects who wear bow ties and very much associated with image and power in the 1980′s, it is a winner of the Compasso d’Oro in 1989. It’s now a part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA).

Tizio lamp, by Richard Sapper, for Artemide

Icon: PK80 daybed

The PK80 daybed was designed by Poul Kjærholm in 1957. Characterized by its low height and distinguished aesthetic, it can be found in museums all over the world. Kjærholm had a particular interest in various construction materials; especially steel, which he considered a natural material. He was a trained carpenter who continued studies at the Danish School of Arts and Crafts. He moved on to work at Fritz Hansen, for about a year, where he designed a number of noteworthy chair prototypes. This particular model was designed for Ejvind Kold Christensen, today it is produced by Fritz Hansen

PK80 daybed, by Poul Kjærholm, for Fritz Hansen

Icon: The Vespa

Designed by Corradino D’Ascanio, an engineer at Piaggio, who also designed, constructed and flew the first modern helicopter. A man who hated motorcycles, D’Ascanio dreamed up this revolutionary new vehicle; drawing from the latest aeronautical technology, he imagined a vehicle built on a unibody steel chassis, the front fork, like a plane’s landing gear, allowed for easy wheel changing. The result was an aircraft-inspired design that to this day remains forward-thinking and unique among all other two-wheeled vehicles.
Upon seeing the vehicle, Enrico Piaggio remarked “Sembra una Vespa!” (“It looks like a wasp!”) and the name stuck. Vespa has lived on from one generation to the next, subtly modifying its image each time. The first Vespa offered mobility to everyone, then, it became the two-wheeler of the post war economic boom. During the sixties and seventies, the vehicle became a symbol for the revolutionary ideas of the time. Advertising campaigns like “He Who Vespas, eats the apple”, and films such as Quadrophenia have come to symbolized these eras.

Vespa Manufactured by Piaggio

Icon: The Butterfly Stool

Ease of travel in the jet age encouraged a growing fusion of cultural influences after World War II. Although Sori Yanagi’s stool was designed and manufactured in Japan, it employs western forms (the stool) and the material (bent plywood). Its calligraphic elegance, however, suggests a distinctly Asian sensibility despite the rarity of such seating furniture in traditional Japanese culture. The stool is made from two curving and inverted L-shaped sections, each forming one leg and half of the seat. A metal rod midway between the legs serves as a stretcher and holds the stool together.

Butterfly Stool, 1956, by Sori Yanagi (Japanese, born 1915); Originally manufactured by Tendo Co. Ltd. Now sold by Vitra.

Icon: Polaroid SX-70

Polaroid’s first fully automatic, motorized camera was an instant design classic, even starring in a documentary the year it was introduced by company cofounder Edwin Land. The camera is detailed with tan leather and folds into a rectangle the size of a paperback book. Smart.

Polaroid SX-70, by Edwin Land, for Polaroid

Icon: Panton Chair

The Panton Chair is the first cantilevered chair made from a single piece of plastic. Sleek, sexy and a technical first, the Panton was the chair of the era. A glossy red Panton featured in Nova magazine’s 1970 shoot in which a model demonstrated “How to undress in front of your husband”.

Panton Classic Chair, 1968, by Verner Panton, for Vitra

Icon: Platner Lounge chair by Knoll

Designed by Warren Platner in 1966, this distinctive series of tables and seating, transformed steel wire into sculptural furniture.

Platner Collection, by Warren Platner, for Knoll

Icon: The Bulthaup B3 Kitchen

Light in Design, the B3 system by bulthaup is the measure of all kitchens; by focusing on ergonomics, task management and keeping it utilitarian, the visual aesthetics are not compromised here. The entire kitchen “floats” by using a supporting frame inside the wall that can bear up to one ton in weight per meter. This is ideal for architects and designers, providing them with an unprecedented level of freedom in design and the efficient use of space. The range of accessories and the way in which spices, tools and even cleaning supplies are tucked away compliment the design. You may never dine out again!

Bulthaup B3 Kitchen, by Herbert H. Schultes, for Bulthaup

Noguchi Prototype Prismatic Table sells for $290,500

An Important and Rare Prototype Prismatic Table for the Alcoa Forecast Program
The Aluminum Corporation of America (Alcoa) program emphasized the artistic and functional possibilities of aluminum. Select commissioned designs were featured in full-page advertisements shot by noted photographers in widely-read weekly magazines. It is for this program that Isamu Noguchi developed the iconic design of the Prismatic table.

Isamu Noguchi, who was the third artist featured in the Forecast program in early 1957, developed an abstract three-dimensional form. Noguchi’s Prismatic tables were conceived in multiple to form a “kaleidoscope” with variant colors with the intention of adaptability. The advertisement photographed by Irving Penn used the table as a casual, yet romantic platform for dinner at home.

Prototype Prismatic Table, Sold at Auction for $290,500, by Isamu Noguchi, at Sotheby’s

Editor's Picks

Bell Side Table
Hand-blown in the traditional manner using a wooden mould, the transparent tinted glass base asserts a sculptural presence in space, contrasting intriguingly with the solid brass frame on top while also forming with it a harmonious unit recalling the elegant curving silhouette of a bell. [more...]

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Design Icons

Fjordfiesta Scandia Senior
by Hans Brattrud

A Norwegian furniture design classic from 1957, Scandia Senior is a comfortable high-back easy chair with a leather head cushion, on a satin swivel base. [more...]

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