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Capsula Pendant Light by Lucie Koldova for Brokis

Capsula pendant light is composed of two oval capsules of glass when external absorbs the internal and by permeating each other they complete compact form. The concept is visualized by two convex capsules one overlapping the another and so merged into one single form which reminds an inspiration of nature, shapes of cells or plant seeds.The combination of outer shell of crystal clear glass and internal capsule of colored glass creates exciting tension of forms and optical 3D effect. Capsula light sculpture is gently fixed together by a tubular light source connected with small wooden side bases and the effect is emphasized by blending the colored core into a crystal clear outer bubble.

Capsula Pendant Light, by Lucie Koldova, for Brokis, Photography © Lucie Koldova / Brokis

Meltdown Pendant Lamp by Johan Lindstén for Cappellini

Meltdown is an interpretation and attempt to make something beautiful from the disastrous nuclear accident in Fukushima. Would an actual meltdown occur and what would the impact be? The disaster is reflected in the lamps where the process already begun and the bulb are about to melt through the last defense of the glass.

Meltdown Pendant Lamp, by Johan Lindstén, for Cappellini

Exhibition: Paul Cocksedge: CAPTURE

Friedman Benda will present Paul Cocksedge: CAPTURE the British designer’s inaugural solo exhibition, the works include Capture, a 5 ¼ ft (1.6 meter) hand-spun aluminum dome that appears to “hold” the peaceful glow of a warm white light. The piece is informed by a process of reduction–a recurring theme in Cocksedge’s work–as it subtracts the typical infrastructure around light, instead creating a hemisphere that seems to stop light from escaping. For White Light, Cocksedge will create a room within the gallery in which everything and nothing changes. For this work, the designer will create an illuminated mosaic of precisely calibrated and positioned colored panels on the ceiling of the gallery. The ceiling will slowly fade from a spectrum of colors to a warm white light, while the room itself will remain unchanged, demonstrating the ways in which we do and do not perceive the interplay of color and light.

The inspiration for Poised comes from the elegance and amenability of paper. Half a ton in weight, the steel table appears improbable upon investigation. Created following an intensive series of calculations regarding gravity, mass, and equilibrium, the table looks as though it is about to fall, but is perfectly weighted and stable.

In addition to these new works, Cocksedge will present three architectural models that take conceptual threads from Capture and White Light and reapply them to architectural settings outside of the gallery space. Central to Cocksedge’s work is an appreciation for the ways in which people respond to and interact with his designs. As a result, potential real world applications of these new works will be explored in a series of architectural models.

Paul Cocksedge: CAPTURE, September 12 – October 12, 2013, at Friedman Benda, New York

LightSky by Stephen Burks for Swarovski

A work of designer Stephen Burks, the highly contemporary shape of LIGHTSKY sends light beaming through brightly infused crystal, echoing a poetry of light reflections into the spatial center.

LightSky Pendant light, by Stephen Burks, for Swarovski

Nendo w132 for Wästberg

Japanese design studio Nendo has recently presented the new Nendo w132 lamp for Swedish manufacturer Wästberg.

A lighting fixture made by assembling its parts: the shade, post and stand. The height and form of the light can be easily changed by adding and rearranging the components. By attaching the wire unit to the shade, it becomes a pendant lamp. Adding a longer pole to the desk lamp makes it a floor stand. The shade is also available in three different shapes: a cone, sphere and a cylinder.

Nendo w132, by Nendo, for Wästberg

Leimu lamps by Magnus Pettersen for Iittala

Iittala is proud to debut Leimu, a new lighting piece by young Norwegian-born designer, Magnus Pettersen. As its flame-evoking name suggests, the copper-brown Leimu creates a relaxed atmosphere for enjoyable moments in good company. With its strong concrete base, the impressive glass lamp portion, inspired by traditional lampshades, makes Leimu a brand-new lighting fixture where sensitivity encounters strength.

Concrete is a captivating material for Pettersen: “It has a raw and cold feel to it. The union of glass and concrete is well known in architecture, but it isn’t necessarily always beautiful. I wanted to smoothly combine opposites in a lamp and show that fierce and sensitive, cold and warm can work well together.” Contrast fascinates Pettersen, whose studio is based in London. His style is referred to as “industrial luxury” because opposites are a recurring feature in his work. He looks at how well different materials or colours merge in an interesting and functional way without prejudice.

From a technical standpoint, harmonising the stem and glass portion was not easy. “Glass is a great material, but it is also very challenging because it is alive and it makes accurate dimensioning very difficult. However, through the know-how of and good communication with Iittala’s glass factory, we were able to combine concrete and glass into an elegant whole.”

Leimu lamp, by Magnus Pettersen, for Iittala

Cloudy Pendant Lamp by Mathieu Lehanneur for Fabbian

Normally, when we look at clouds, we seek organic shapes, similar to objects of living beings. In this case, the creative process has been reversed: this is a special object which, during its creation, revealed all its potential. “Cloudy is a paradox! – explains young designer, Mathieu Lehanneur – This lamp has been created using extremely complex steel moulds, which have given it an almost magical lightness, a glass cloud floating in the air”.

An object-lamp therefore which, from the pencil of the designer to its engineering and manufacture, has taken on the shape of a light and evanescent cloud. “By mixing together clear white glass with high-luminosity LEDs – explains Mathieu – Cloudy is a ray of sun after the rain!”

The Cloudy “cloud”, when switched on, thus reveals all its luminosity and evokes sunlight after the rain. A design lamp containing in itself a positive sign of hope and optimism. Cloudy, available as a suspension lamp or light fitting, features gradient white blown glass and die-cast aluminium structure. It is lit by high-power LED lamps.

Cloudy Pendant Lamp, by Mathieu Lehanneur, for Fabbian

Volt Lamp by Rodolfo Dordoni for Flos

With a retro, almost art deco feel, Volt has a blown-glass shade that comes in two different shapes: a semi-circle, or an upside-down bucket, both reminiscent of the atmosphere and shapes from the 1930s. The base is either metal or plastic. Clean, basic shapes, classicality and lighting inventions: Dordoni finds aesthetic function in the LED cooling mechanism, thus endowing an unadorned technical element with unsuspected formal elegance. The copper lamellae inside the glass pipe become a changing pattern on the shaft that holds up the lampshade.

“We were fascinated by the industrial appearance of this new pipe, so we decided to highlight its form so much as to make it the focal point and decorative element of the lamp itself”, Dordoni explains. The path that was followed toward the creating of the Volt table lamp is a review of key steps in a century-long design process, meaning the search for the “Right Form”. The elements of this search are frequently seen in the world of lamp manufacturing, and particularly every time new technology or production methods find direct application on the market.

Volt, by Rodolfo Dordoni, for Flos

Odeon Lamp by Studio Klass for FontanaArte

“We wanted a lamp with a strong relationship with surrounding environment, an abiding correlation between light and space”

Contemporary technology brought us many items – smartphones, tablets, e-books – shifting our IT fulchrum from home-offices to living room, changing the direction we usually reach informations: before we went to a desk where the PC was, now portable digital data can follow us everywhere. For this reason, sometimes we need an ambient light that smooths the contrasts between digital displays and a completely dark room, and can be used as a relaxing light to enjoy a tv show or just talking while sitting on a sofa.

The Odeon lamp for FontanaArte is entirely covered in cuoietto leather and casts its light to the wall, thus creating a comfy and warm glow of refracted light, while the other side is opaque and screens the bulb. The leather handle allows people to place the lamp anywhere into a room, next to a sofa, near the wall so it will become a quiet presence.

Odeon Lamp for FontanaArte, by Studio Klass, Photography ©Pietro Cocco/Studio Klass

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