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Icon: 606 Universal Shelving System by Dieter Rams for DePadova

In 1960 Dieter Rams conceived of a shelving system “…that could be expanded, rearranged and moved when necessary. The system initially went by the name RZ 60, and in 1970 was renamed the 606 Universal Shelving System, which continues to be a success today. Its popularity derives from the fact that lt offers restrained simplicity while the individual components offer great flexibility for the ever-changing lives of the owner. Over the years the wall-mounted shelving evolved to allow it to be compressed between the floor and ceiling (from 1970). A series of drawers, cabinets and integrated tables permits it to accommodate almost all requirements.” (Less and More: The Design Ethos of Dieter Rams)

606 Universal Shelving System by Dieter Rams, Available in annodized aluminium or white powder coated aluminium, for DePadova

Exhibition: Friso Kramer: Revolt at Galerie Catherine Houard

Catherine Houard presents the first exhibition in Paris dedicated to Friso Kramer, the Dutch Master of Design. Born in 1922, Friso Kramer was the son of the architect Piet Kramer. He played a significant role in developing the national Dutch style, from 1940 until now. His ideas have constantly helped expand the modern aesthetics of the Netherlands. Kramer began his career as a designer in the industrial field in 1948 at De Cirkel’s, a manufacturer of steel furniture. In the 1950’s he joined the group ‘Goed Wonen’ (‘Good Living’) that was created to reinstall or recreate a good quality of life that disappeared during the war.

In 1953, he created the ‘Revolt Chair’, a popular icon of the Dutch style, at Ahrend’s and was featured at the Triennale of Milan in 1954. At the dawn of his 90th birthday, Friso Kramer is in the spotlight in the Netherlands. At the end of November, he was honored with a tribute at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and in the book written by Yvonne Brentjens ‘De Stoel van Friso Kramer / Friso Kramer Chair’ which has been just re-published in English and Dutch.

Friso Kramer, January 18 – March 2, 2013, at Galerie Catherine Houard, Paris
via: Design Art News Catherine Houard

Netframe by Cate & Nelson for OFFECCT

Cate & Nelson’s idea behind Netframe was to create a piece of furniture that consumes as little material as possible while maintaining a high comfort. “In order to succeed with this challenge we had to turn everything upside down in the development process. We wanted it to be easy to produce with minimal time and material usage”, says Nelson Ruiz-Acal, one half of Cate & Nelson.

Netframe was developed into a very comfortable piece of furniture with extremely low impact on the environment. Cate & Nelson believe it is important to see the wholeness in their design, that the product is responsible at all stages; from production to usage, which is very apparent in their design of Netframe.

Netframe, by Cate & Nelson, for OFFECCT

Stripe Chair by Oliver Schick for Skandiform

Stripe is an upholstered lounge chair in a slim and lightweight appearing design. A special and simple linkage between the plywood seat shell and the base frame made of steel, makes the chair smoothly rocking without any mechanical suspension.

Stripe, by Oliver Schick, for Skandiform

Juno Chair by Patrick Frey for FreiFrau

Juno can be construed as symbolic of a classic farmhouse chair. To create it, the designer implemented traditional artisanship techniques in combination with a variety of modern elements. In doing so, he succeeded in reinterpreting the archetypal wooden chair entirely, while still staying true to its origins. The resulting piece is an impressive interpretation, but offers a great deal more comfort. The seat is made of a flexible, moulded wood shell that yields when it is leaned upon. Overall, Juno conveys a less rustic impression, and considerably more femininity. Juno is a sturdy yet elegant chair that inspires curiosity and has an almost sculptural appeal.

Juno Chair, by Patrick Frey, for FreiFrau

Mint Side Table by Sebastian Herkner for Böwer

On the inside, it’s a bar, on the outside it’s mini.

The story behind the table is the celebration of traditional wood turning. The sweet bit: Mint hides and integrates a small mini-bar that allows you to store a nice bottle of wine or other delicious beverages and glasses, which are placed on a separate tray inside. The design provides an inserted intermediate bottom for the glasses and black chrome slide-open lid on the top of the side table Mint.

Mint Side Table, by Sebastian Herkner, for Böwer

Exhibition: Yrjö Kukkapuro Furniture

In 1998 Finland issued a design-themed stamp set which featured some of the most iconic works of local design history: besides product and textile designs by Alvar Aalto, Kaj Franck, Bertel Gardberg, Timo Sarpaneva and Annika Rimala, furniture design was represented by one chair — Yrjö Kukkapuro’s Karuselli.

The exhibition in the Museum of Estonian Architecture gives an overview of the interior architect and furniture designer Yrjö Kukkapuro’s artistic production which spans over 50 years. Starting with a student work from 1957 and concluding with a prototype specially designed and manufactured for the Tallinn exhibition, Kukkapuro’s long career is filled with independent experiments in the field but also includes positions as the chief designer of Haimi, Lepokaiusto and Avarte. Kukkapuro’s first successful collection Moderno was created in 1958-1960 and is still in production.

Kukkapuro’s oeuvre is like an X-ray of the design history of the second half of the 20th century. Pop-art influenced colourful plastic chairs, Karuselli, Saturnus or Chair No. 419 manufactured in the 1960s from fibreglass and ABS plastic using experimental methods are contemporary benchmarks carried by utoplan aspirations. The minimalist turn in 1970s abandoned artificial materials, new favourite was birch plywood. Remmi and Pressu models date from that period but at the same time Kukkapuro started decades’ long experiment to create ergonomic office chairs. Piaano, Fysio, Sirkus or Funktus are series which thoroughly redefined the understanding about typical office furniture. in the 1980s the wave of Postmodernism brought back colour, patterns and décor to Kukkapuro’s chairs. The 1990s are characterized by the abstract patterns printed on simple plywood form from
the “tattooed” chairs series and in the 2000s the explorations in materials continue. New favourite is bamboo from which there is a series specially made for Chinese market.

Some of the earlier chairs of the still tenaciousiy active Yrjö Kukkapuro have become design classics which are sought-after in online auctions and vintage furniture stores, at the same time being exhibited in renowned design museums from London to New York. The exhibits, prototypes as well as production models, of the Tallinn exhibition are mainly from Kukkapuro’s personal collection which he has gathered in his atelier over the years.

Yrjö Kukkapuro Furniture, Jan 11 – Feb 10, 2013, at the Museum of Estonian Architecture, Tallinn, Estonia

Euvira Rocking Chair by Jader Almeida for ClassiCon

With its precisely orchestrated flowing lines, thickening and tapering to form a pleasing rhythm, the chair is a signature expression of contemporary design. At the same time, the choice of materials and their treatment recalls the work of the great Brazilian design masters of the 1960s and 70s. While offering all the comfort of a capacious rocking chair, the piece’s fine lines and the way the armrests and runners taper towards the middle make an airy and elegant impression from any angle. The cord seat and backrest lend the chair a special lightness and transparency, unfolding a fascinating graphic play of lines especially when in motion. The version in dark stained oak with black cord attests the most strikingly to the origin of its designer. In pale oak with hemp-coloured cord, the chair looks almost like a Scandinavian furniture classic. With fabric or leather upholstery, it takes on the feel of an elegant club chair. In every version, though, it oscillates effortlessly between past and present, stability and elegance.

Euvira Rocking Armchair, by Jader Almeida, for ClassiCon

Beams Chair by Eric and Johnny Design Studio

The Beams Chair is a lightweight wooden armchair inspired by the H-beam structure of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. The H-Beam structure is derived and used as a main design element in the Beams Chair, which shows the beauty of such construction. The main frame of the Chair is composed of two kinds of thin wood panel:multiplex and plywood. The two wood panels are combined together in such a way so as to offer directional perpendicular wooden structures and to create the H-Beam structure in the Chair. By such inventive arrangement of the wood panel, the specific H-beam structure is built up and an extraordinary stability of the Chair is ensured.

The Chair is made of three different kinds of wood, bent plywood, multiplex and aircraft plywood.The strength of the structure of the plywood and multiplex thin sheets is quite strong in one direction, while relatively weak in other direction. By combining the two wood sheets in a way so to offer directional perpendicular wooden structures and to build the H-Beam structure, there are two strong dimensions so the anti-twisting ability and compression strength as well as the stability of the chair are tremendously improved. The frame of the chair is constructed by bending plywood and multiplex. The flexible aircraft plywood covers the frame as the surfaces of the seat and back. Such design saves the molding cost of production and reduces the weight of the Chair.

Beams Chair, by Eric and Johnny Design Studio

Exhibition: The Lattes Chair: Estate of Carlo Mollino

Mass-produced midcentury furniture by the Italian modernist Carlo Mollino can cost a few thousand dollars per piece, and his prototypes and custom works cause greater market stirs.

In 2005 and 2008, Christie’s in New York got seven-figure prices for 1940s oak and maple tables that Mollino created for a marquis in Turin. The designer worked in a vocabulary of hairpin turns, spikes and flanges. He was also notoriously moody and obsessive, and a daredevil who flew experimental planes, scaled mountains and raced cars.

His colorful biography adds to the appeal of the objects. “They have a huge aura about them,” said Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, the founder of the Salon 94 galleries in Manhattan.

A show with a few Mollino works from around 1950 (with five- and six-figure prices each) opens on Thursday at the Salon 94 branch on East 94th Street; display cases were designed by the British architect David Adjaye. The exhibition includes an ash bentwood chair and a resin-and-glass bookcase, made for a Turin publishing house, and aluminum boomerang light fixtures from a textile magnate’s apartment in Turin.

On Oct. 23 the Italian government blocked an auction at Christie’s in London that featured 30 pieces of 1950s Mollino furniture, which had long been installed in an Italian industrialist’s country house in the foothills of the Alps. The works, including oak and chestnut tables, chairs, cabinets and ceramic coat hooks, were deemed by the government to be treasures that could not be exported. (They were returned to their owner.)

On Dec. 10 Sotheby’s in New York will offer four 1940s oak chairs (estimated at $100,000 to $150,000 for the set) with split backs that a private collector found years ago at a Los Angeles tag sale. Mollino used the split-back design in ski resort and restaurant interiors, but no one knows where the tag-sale chairs originated.

The Lattes Chair: Estate of Carlo Mollino
November 15, 2012 – January 25, 2013, at Salon 94, Article by Eve M. Kahn for The New York Times, via: Design Art News

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