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Exhibition: Spring by Mathieu Lehanneur

In his ‘Spring’ exhibition at Carpenters Workshop Gallery in London, Mathieu Lehanneur takes us into a world of flux. As if the cycle of the seasons and nature’s forces have specially looked at the fate of objects… Here, the artist-designer with a passion for science, grapples with ancestral materials in order to suffuse them with plasticity, fluidity and tone.

The works in the ‘Spring’ exhibition seem to hesitate between solid, liquid and gaseous. They appear to be suspended mid-transformation in a poetic state of metamorphosis. Marble and aluminium become liquid, onyx becomes air and glass softens as in a return to its original state.

Mathieu Lehanneur: ‘Spring’ exhibition, (17 – 25 September 2016), at Carpenters Workshop Gallery, London

No-No tables by Note and Norm for Menu

No-No tables are a result of two Scandinavian design studios meeting and being inspired by an old patinaed Italian marble floor during a visit to Milan. “The tilting of the floor was put together from leftover pieces of stone. Almost randomly the different slabs of marble in a variety of qualities and colors came together in a beautiful disordered patten, that made it into the most beautiful graphic artwork.”, Kristoffer Fagerström explains. The thought of using this normally elevated and luxurious material in a more casual way became the starting point of this collaborative project between Note and Norm. Later the same day, Note Design Studio stumbled into Norm Architects somewhere in Milan and a discussion about the beauty of the random qualities of the floor – which you also find in the traditional Japanese landscape architecture – morphed into to a product idea for the design company Menu.

No-No tables, by Note Design Studio and Norm Architects for Menu

Assemblage Wood Dining Table and Bench by Fort Standard

A part of Fort Standard’s “Qualities of Material” collection, the Assemblage table and bench are made from hundreds of thin, hard maple slats. The slats are assembled into triangular tubes used to create the hollow top surfaces and hexagonal legs of this matching dining set.

Assemblage Wood Dining Table and Bench, by Fort Standard
Photos by Brian Ferry

DS-373 Sofa by Alfredo Häberli for de Sede

“The sofa DS-373 is my homage to de Sede’s fascination with neck-leather. The folds in this five millimetre thick leather are so elegantly arranged that a single bullhide creates an understated, perfectly-formed sofa. The basis and inspiration was a small leather elephant found at a flea market. Made from a smooth piece of leather, it features an exquisitely folded design, giving it its three-dimensional shape.”

DS-373 Sofa, by Alfredo Häberli, for de Sede

Exposition: Pierre Paulin’s Chairs at Centre Pompidou

Between 1959 and 1975, Pierre Paulin created several iconic designs for Artifort, including the famous Ribbon chair, the Mushroom and the Tongue. These timeless designs, which were created in the Artifort workshops, are for the most part still in production today. They are distributed around the world and continue to be a source of fascination because they are so modern.

Centre Pompidou in Paris is paying tribute to Pierre Paulin’s work with a comprehensive retrospective devoted to the designer’s work. The museum has decided to add a Pierre Paulin lounge to the exhibition galleries giving visitors the opportunity to sit down in some of Artifort’s most comfortable sofas and chairs.

Pierre Paulin at Centre Pompidou

Ink Desk by Jasper Morrison for Molteni & C

Ink is made of American walnut, it is trapezoidal in shape and you access it by opening a door which is tilted to become a work top. Inside the compartment, three drawers, LED lighting and another compartment fitted with sockets for connecting all kinds of electronic devices, even if the name Ink recalls traditional handwriting done with pen, ink and paper, but above all with ideas.

Ink Desk, by Jasper Morrison, for Molteni & C

Hole by Kensaku Oshiro

The combination of Kristalia’s technology with Kensaku Oshiro’s creativity has led to Hole: a table featuring an original base and an oval hole, with a softly moulded shape in sheet metal, made using a process that involves many moulding and bending phases. This original and stable base, available in various finishes, supports a thin laminate or solid wood (thicker) top. Two options are available for this furnishing object with a truly unique personality.

Hole, by Kensaku Oshiro, for Kristalia

Niloo by Khodi Feiz for Artifort

A design with its roots in the research of the archetypical two-part African chair of the Congo region, Niloo is a reinterpretation of this typology bringing it into today’s relevant context. The simple idea of two parts simply sliding together and interlocking to form a comfortable chair is just as relevant today as it has been for centuries past.

Interestingly enough, in the 1950s, Artifort blazed the trail of innovative design with the Congo and Pinguïn chair, designed by Theo Ruth, chairs that were also inspired by this typology. Niloo is following in its predecessor’s footsteps by applying the same technique that involves two elements seamlessly fitting together. Through this design, we pay tribute to Artifort’s history while setting our sights on the future.

The design describes two foam moulded upholstered parts, one being a composition of a curvaceous back emerging into the front feet and the other being a generous seat turning into the hind leg. The great development challenge was in creating an embracing and comfortable chair while making sure that the structure is strong and sturdy.

‘For me Niloo is all about the synergy of practicality and comfort. Imagine having to haul a fauteuil up three flights of stairs or the space-saving attributes during transport. And when slid together a simple chair emerges, almost iconic in image.’ Khodi Feiz.

Niloo, by Khodi Feiz, for Artifort

Aritco Elevator by Alexander Lervik

“For a while now, I’ve been working for the platform lift-makers Aritco on a brief to design a lift like a piece of furniture. It’s taken three years, from a blank sheet of paper to the final product in which I designed everything from the shaft to the lift platform and also came up with a whole new solution for the lift control panel. My ambition was to come up with the ultimate flexibility for consumers, who have to be able to identify with their choice of lift through a range of options in terms of materials and colours. Lighting was a key element throughout the prototyping in that the lift walls are backlit under a surface covered in patterns or images. The lift for Aritco is due to be launched to tie in with Stockholm Design Week 2016 and will be the first-ever purpose-designed residential lift to reach the market”.

Aritco Elevator, by Alexander Lervik

Halo by Nichetto Studio

Stockholm is a city of candlelight, with candles illuminating countless venues and gatherings across the Swedish capital. Inspired by this, Luca Nichetto designed an oil lamp in hand-blown Murano glass. Comprising two connecting components, the lamp echoes the form of a wine glass, subtly suggesting the act of drinking. A coloured opaque base sits under a larger transparent top, which is available in several patterns. As well as being ornamental, these patterns transform the nature of the light emitted by the lamp. As the patterns overlap, they form complex motifs, granting the lamp a decorative quality that shines through even when the lamp is off.

Halo, by Nichetto Studio
Photography by Studio Pointer

Editor's Picks

Bell Side Table
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