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DM Residence by CUBYC Architects

DM Residence, Keerbergen, Belgium, by CUBYC Architects
Photography by Thomas De Bruyne and Koen Van Damme

Camino Norte House by William F. Cody

Camino Norte House, Palm Springs, California, by William F. Cody, via: Plastolux, Photography © James Haefner

House in Yatsugatake by Kidosaki Architects Studio

Located on a sloping mountain ridge at the foot of the Yatsugatake Mountains, this house was designed on a piece of land that offers spectacular views that are rarely known. Seeking for the best in picturesque scenery, the client took up residence in Tateshina, and spent many years searching for the ideal site for building his house.Inevitably, the main aim of this project is to meet the client’s expectations to incorporate these stunning views in to the design.

When I visited the site, my first impression was that this untapped and expansive nature must be embraced into the interior to the greatest extent possible. I decided to arrange the house in such that this horizontal expanded scenery must be maximized. In order to realize this design, I introduced mega structures column enabling half of the house to extend into the air. To support this large overhanging floor, 2 diagonal bracing steel cylinders, each 300 mm in diameter is introduced. With this, the house is floats in to the midst of a glorious natural surroundings. With this overhanging structure, the breeze of the mountain plateau flow through the interior, makes you coexistent with nature.

When you are invited to the entranceway, after passing through the restrained space of the hallway, and as you enter in to this dramatic space, magnificent and impressive scenery spreads out before your eyes. Living / dining / kitchen area, the majestic panoramic view extends on all three sides is something you can’t find anywhere else, but here in this space. And the scenery is all to your own.

This space is an extravagant experience that only those who have given a privilege to be invited can truly enjoy. Other rooms are planed to offer differing views of the mountains, enabling a variety of views from each of the rooms. The high ceilings and wide wood deck and eaves enable a space steeped in the overwhelming presence of the panoramic views of the area.The feeling is so intense that it is almost as if you are living on a cloud.

The various components have been elevated through careful attention to detailing, and the refinement of the structure gives a sense of tension and unity to the space and adequate materials, achieving the proper balance between a dominance over and a harmony with the surrounding natural environment. The character and humility of this dwelling, constructed without compromising the vision of the architect, expresses a dignified reverence for the scenery surrounding it.

House in Yatsugatake, Nagano, Japan, by Kidosaki Architects Studio

Kirkpatrick House by George Nelson & Gordon Chadwick

Over the course of… four years, George Nelson, along with his associate Gordon Chadwick, would execute a highly personalized design-a home tailored to the members and lifestyle of the Kirkpatrick family. This itself is not remarkable-it could be said of any architectural commission. What makes the Kirkpatrick House so special-then and now-are the universal qualities that transcend the specifics.

The best Nelson designs, be it a clock, chair, or in this case, home, share that same elusive trait. His view of design allowed for both modular system and mannerist quirk. As an “architect in industry” (as he categorized himself in the introduction to the 1948 Herman Miller Collection catalogue), Nelson was responsible for creating-and making salable-consumer goods. In the Kirkpatrick House, it becomes clear that this mentality affected his practice of architecture in equal measure. A product had to be unique to stand out in the market, but it also had to appeal to a wide array of people to be successful. Even in the execution of this private home for personal friends, Nelson’s brand of modernism embraces this duality fully.

Kirkpatrick House, Kalamazoo, Michigan, by George Nelson, Gordon Chadwick
via: Herman Miller

Casa Altamira by Joan Puigcorbé

Casa Altamira, Ciudad Colón, Costa Rica, by Joan Puigcorbé, Paas Arquitectura
Photography © Rodrigo Montoya, Joan Puigcorbé

Charlotte Perriand’s La Maison au Bord de l’Eau at Art Basel Miami Beach

This compact beach house was originally designed in 1934 by Charlotte Perriand, the celebrated 20th-century architect and designer and right-hand woman of architect Le Corbusier. Unveiled as part of Design Miami, the compact construction is fittingly located on the beach, behind The Raleigh Hotel. Perriand designed the house for a competition sponsored by L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui magazine, it introduced her concept for an economical form of eco-friendly, pre-fabricated holiday home and she won second prize. The design was never actually built, although the idea was later reworked into several other variations. But now, eight decades later, Louis Vuitton has brought the original beach house design to life with the assistance of her daughter Pernette Perriand-Barsac.

Charlotte Perriand’s La Maison au Bord de l’Eau, Art Basel Miami Beach, Louis Vuitton
via: The Telegraph

House in Shinoharadai by Tai and Associates

The site is situated on a small hill in Yokohama. A new program, composed of two-family residence and office, is applied to the building, while paying attention to preserve the family’s history and memories attached to the land. The building is divided in different volumes according to the scale of the surrounding residences. The podium is constructed of concrete retaining walls, the main volume, which is regarded as piano nobile, is made of concrete using wood panel formwork with tongue-and-groove joints, and the white volume contains office. The form of each volume expresses a different function inside.

The interior space is planned around the old pine tree with the family history. Living/dining/kitchen space of the parents’ house is located around the tree, and the exterior wall continues into the interior space, integrating the terrace and the living room.

Children’s house and office shares the main entrance. The impressive stairs lead to the second floor from the entrance hall. All the volumes protrude into the void, with the soft natural light cascading from above; this is the symbolic space of this architecture.

The office has a modern interior space based on black and white in harmony with the landscape.

From the second floor one can enjoy a full panorama of Yokohama Bay. The second floor is composed of an open plan in order to provide fine views from everywhere for the children’s family. Living/dining/kitchen space extends to the roof terrace continuously, so that the interior and the exterior merge into each other, and the house will open up towards the sky.

These three separate functions are closely connected with the exterior in different ways, while placed at an appropriate distance where one can feel presence of others.

House in Shinoharadai, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, by Tai and Associates
Photography © Seiichi Ohsawa

Vertical Net Structures: DRX 2013

The focus on “Vertical Net Structures” for the DRX 2013 was a continuation of last year’s investigation into innovative structures for the design of high-rise buildings. Driven by the increasing demand for supertall buildings, we developed integral structures that define interesting interior spaces through controlled articulation without compromising the integrity of the system. Questions of structure, circulation and program distribution had to be addressed in a prototypical building of approximately 450m height.

The aim was to understand forces as vectors in order to develop 3-dimensional spatial nets. These systems were developed and based on profound research in various areas such as high-rise structural systems, natural systems as well as form-finding techniques. Throughout the DRX, these systems were further informed and transformed into highly constrained, feasible proposals for tall buildings.

Vertical Net Structures DRX 2013, at HENN

Findlay Residence by Splyce Design

Designed for a young active family of four, the principal living spaces of the home are organized around a two storey exterior void within the main volume of the building. Planted with bamboo and glazed on either side, this cutout serves to create separation between spaces without fully disengaging them from one another. On the main floor, the bamboo garden subtly divides the kitchen/dining space from the living area- a dynamic that serves the family well with their busy and differing schedules. On the upper floor, the tall bamboo from below screens the master bedroom sleeping and change area from its adjoining bathroom. These two spaces are connected with a glazed bridge. Light and shadow animate the white walls by the passing sun as it enters through the large skylight above the central staircase. Windows and doors are calibrated to capture the natural light and views to the garden and mountains beyond. On the building’s west elevation, large sliding glass doors activate the adjacent patios allowing space to flow from inside to out, and all at once the space becomes pavilion-like with its ample porosity. In contrast, the street elevation on the north reads more formally with its cedar and concrete walls stretching out horizontally across the site and into the landscape. Due to site constraints, there is no usable back yard, so the front serves as a playing field for the client’s two boys. A simple interior palette consisting of concrete floors, white lacquered and oak cabinets and white walls serve to strengthen the clarity and purity of the spaces and allows the vibrancy of the the natural environment and landscape features to pervade.

Findlay Residence, North Vancouver, Canada, by Splyce Design

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