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Panama House by Marcio Kogan

Brazilian architect Marcio Kogan plays with space in a way that makes you think that if he ever gets bored, a second career as a movie set designer awaits.
Through all four projects, the box form – Kogan’s favourite motif – occurs time and again but in carefully nuanced combinations: precisely planed concrete boxes within boxes (a function of security concerns in São Paulo); stoned lined boxes on top of boxes; and timber slatted boxes that open outwards towards a slim-lined lap pool perhaps with no doors to mark inside or outside.

Can’t get enough of Brazilian homes designed by Marcio Kogan?
More Daily Icon posts: Beach House, Casa Mirindiba, Osler House and Casa Corten.

Panama House, São Paulo, Brazil, by Marcio Kogan
via: Wallpaper*

O House by Philippe Stuebi Architekten

On both, the front and the lake side, this sculptural villa shows very expressive and ornamental facades. Facing mount pilatus the white concrete elements are dotted with circular openings that allow glimpses into the two-levelled orangery with its exotic plants, as well as the lounge, the guest tract and the staircase accessed through one of the openings at the ground floor. The lake side with superb mountain views of the rigi and the bürgenstock shows off a protruding, glistering loggia made of round glass bricks. Very decorative, such elements are a strong contrast to the rough renderings of the side facades. The basement nestles along the slope and opens into a large fitness area with a 25 meter pool, half inside, half outside, which is inserted in a white terrazzo plate. This terrazzo plate extends gracefully from the pool bar located inside along the boathouse made of white tinted, rough jetted concrete into lake lucerne.

O House, Lucerne, Switzerland, by Philippe Stuebi Architekten Gmbh

House at Janelas Verdes by Pedro Domingos Arquitectos

The project consist in the reconstruction of building from the 19th century, inserted in the Lapa/Prazeres district. The pre-existing build was in an advanced degree of degradation, the facades and the side walls were the only usable structure.

House at Janelas Verdes, Lisbon, Portugal, by Pedro Domingos Arquitectos
via: Arch Daily

Metla Timber Building by SARC Architects

The Metla Building stands out on the campus of the University of Joensuu due to its material and its concise form. From the exterior, the building appears to be a wood box. The forecourt, which is the gate to the building and which is demarcated by the walls made from logs from demolished houses. The offices and laboratory facilities of the research institute curl around the inner courtyard and the vestibule. The yard is dominated by the conference facilities, which resemble a boat that has been turned upside down, and the sloped columns of the vestibule, which have been inspired by the log booms from floating logs down rivers.

The Finnish Forest Research Institutes (METLA), Joensuu, Finland, by SARC Architects
via: Arch Daily

Cabel Industry HQ by Massimo Mariani

Cabel Industry produced software systems for banks. Then new headquarters is created using a single sign: architectural global shape, fastenings, entrance cuts, furniture handles and decorations. During the day coloured glass create liquid chromatic effects inside black and white offices, instead of night time when coloured cuts project out vivid lighting effects underlining holes, cuts and shapes of the building.

Cabel Industry headquarters, Empoli, Italy, by Massimo Mariani, via: dezeen

Ginkgo Lounge Portugal by Tiago Rosado

Ginkgo Lounge, Portimão, Portugal, by Tiago Rosado, via: Arch Daily

Gerês House by Graça Correia e Roberto Ragazzi

The project demonstrates how architecture can delicately integrate in nature. Designed by Graça Correia and Roberto Ragazzi, it is located on a plot bordering the Cavado River in the Gerês region of Portugal. It elegantly composes with the natural surroundings, as its pure volumetric form with its concrete finish anchors itself on one side, and then protrudes in the air with an impressive cantilever that points toward the river.

Gerês House, Caniçada, Vieira do Minho, Portugal, by Graça Correia e Roberto Ragazzi, Correia Ragazzi Arquitectos

New BMW Museum by Atelier Bruecknen

Yatzer has an in-depth article about the new BMW Museum by Atelier Bruecknen in Munich. Opened on June 21st, 2008, it sets a new standard in the realm of brand-focused museums. Along with the BMW Welt, opened in October 2007, and the BMW factory tour, the museum is the final component of the BMW Triad, where two million visitors are expected annually.

In contrast to construction projects of other automobile manufactures, the new museum building would not originate in a green meadow; instead, it was a matter of integrating the new museum into the existing structural fabric of the group headquarters in Munich, according to the brochures handed out at the start of the tour. Here, trendsetting architecture already had a presence from the original 1973 plans of the Viennese architect Karl Schwanzer. This ensemble consists of the “Four Cylinder” high-rise construction, the adjoining low buildings, and the “Museum Bowl” which carries the BMW logo on the roof, and has subsequently developed into a landmark of the car group.

New BMW Museum by Atelier Bruecknen, Munich, Germany, Photographs: Marcus Buck, Birgit Kadatz, Sebastian Schroeter and Marcus Meyer, via: Yatzer

For Sale: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fawcett House

The southern edge of Los Banos [in the San Joaquin valley], where only dusty roads and distant silos interrupt the endless landscape of tilled Central Valley soil, seems an unlikely place to happen upon the work of America’s architectural icon. But past the cattle feedlot and leaning hay barn, deep in a field where winter wheat and cantaloupe mark the seasons, sits a ranch house designed by an aging Frank Lloyd Wright.

Fawcett House, 1961, Los Banos, California, $2.7 million, by Frank Lloyd Wright
Listing Agent: Crosby Doe Associates
Article: SF Gate

RATP Bus Centre Paris by ECDM

Located in the southern suburban area of Paris along wide boulevards and roadway interchanges, in an industrial landscape characterised by a succession of boxes, the RATP Bus Centre in Thiais controls all the bus lines in the south and east of Paris.
The structure displays a non slippery texture of dots in relief like a game of Lego.

RATP Bus Centre, Thiais, France by Emmanuel Combarel Dominique Marrec
Photographs: Benoit Fougeirol – Philippe Ruault
via: Arch Daily

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