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Fouquet’s Barrière Hotel by Edouard François

French architect and landscape designer Edouard François was encharged of the renovation and façade design of the Fouquet’s Barrière Hotel in Paris, which is located in one block facing Avenue des Champs Elysées. The architect mission was the general plan of the whole hotel, including courtyards, administration offices and a spa service, spread on different plots of the “golden triangle”, and the design of new facades for extensions. The surrounding area is the most elegant and expensive of the whole metropolis, and very significant in terms of architecture and relation with the context.

Fouquet’s Barrière Hotel, Paris, France, by Edouard François
via: Arch Daily

The Saphire Gallery by XTEN Architecture

The Saphire Gallery is a residential gallery addition to a private residence. It is designed to display a private collection of contemporary art while also providing for a home office with views to the sorrounding hills.

The new structure is grafted onto the circulation spine of the existing house and lifted off the ground to provide a minimal footprint. Freeing the ground plane creates a new multi-functional hardscape/landscape area for the family that they use as carport, children’s play area, for art parties and video projections. A structural system of lightweight braced frames was developed.

The Saphire Gallery, Los Angeles, California, USA, by XTEN Architecture
via: Arch Daily

Icon: Johnson House (Riebe House) by Pierre Koenig

The Johnson house, Pierre Koenig’s only building in Northern California, was built on a 20-by-20-foot grid. Glass curtain walls open the house to the landscaping and expansive views. A see-through central fireplace forms the centerpiece of the open-plan living-dining area.
Koenig’s additions in 1988 included two new bedrooms, filling the former carport and entry, and providing a new carport in an added wing. The project also involved stripping away a dropped ceiling, wood veneer paneling that hid the steel siding, bay windows, and Victorian-style beveled-glass doors.
“It’s absolutely, completely functional and complete and honest in the delight of its revealed structure. It’s so simple and beautiful, so unadorned. It’s direct and a joy to live in,” Cynthia Riebe says of the house. “I love the night light and how it changes, and the reflections through the interior and the exterior. There’s no boundary between the two.”

The house was restored and expanded by Cynthia and Fred Riebe during the 1990s with the help of Koenig himself. Structure: Steel-framed and steel-sided. The ceilings and exterior walls are unadorned, corrugated steel decking. Laminated wallboard sheathes the interior walls.

Johnson House, 1962, Carmel Valley, California, USA, by, Pierre Koenig
via: Eichler Network, More: New York Times

The Hergé Museum by Christian de Portzamparc

Designed by French architect and winner of the Pritzker Prize, Christian de Portzamparc, the Hergé Museum is due to open on June 2nd of this year. The icon that was (and still is) Tintin played a role in most of our childhoods. Even today Tintin and Snowy are making waves in recently translated Chinese copies in Asia. A stroke of comic-book genius, Tintin evolved from the brush of belgian artist Georges Prosper Remi, or as he is more commonly known, Hergé. Unfortunately the masterful Hergé passed away in 1983 but thanks to the new Hergé Museum in Brussels, its not too late to pay hommage to his work.

The Hergé Museum, by Christian de Portzamparc
via: Ape to Gentleman.

Raumati Beach House by Herriot + Melhuish Architecture

The house on the beach at Raumati is discreetly folded between neighbours, a very simple form deceptively simply executed. Rooms are large but few, open but with complete privacy. This house demonstrates that a home need not be huge to be made of luxuriously large spaces. All year living is not only practical, but offers the attractions of watching a storm strike the windows while the open fire blazes.

Raumati Beach House, Raumati, New Zealand by Herriot + Melhuish Architecture

Model: Frank Lloyd Wright: Herbert Jacobs House #1

The New York Times shows an Image from “Frank Lloyd Wright: From Within Outward,” an exhibition currently on view at the Guggenheim Museum, the models of Wright’s designs are attracting as much attention as the exhibition itself. Perhaps the most notable model is that of Wright’s Herbert Jacobs House #1 of 1936-37, the first of the architect’s pioneering open-plan, energy-efficient Usonian houses. The basswood model takes the house’s components — from its window frames to its innovative copper-piped radiant-heating system — and explodes them, so that they seem to hang in midair.

Frank Lloyd Wright: The Re-Model, at The Moment, New York Times

Coffou Cottage by Brininstool+Lynch

For decades, the woods and fields of SW Michigan and NW Indiana, with their close proximity to Lake Michigan, have offered Chicagoans weekend reprieves from urban intensity – and a short travel distance. To gain a sense of rural privacy, the owners were looking to experience pastoral views of nature and foliage, more than lake views, in searching for their vacation property. They were fortunate to find the land that fit their aesthetic aspirations and wanted a home that would similarly match their concepts for living.
The cottage was designed with a simple structure, a horizontal wood rain screen of cedar to privatize the entry sequence on the North, and a wall of operable glass on the South. The open plan of the kitchen, dining, living area and porch as one room intensifies the views to meadow and woods to the South and maximizes the solar gain in the winter. Radiant heat in the ground concrete floors is enhanced by passive solar gain, and runs throughout the three-bedroom cottage. The arrangement of the rooms and glass are to maximize views of the outdoor environment, while providing the most energy efficient operation.

Coffou Cottage, Michigan City, Indiana, USA, by Brininstool+Lynch

Draeger House by Philippe Stuebi Architekten

the holiday house sits as walkable sculptural building in the strong landscape with a square ruin, old retaining walls, large rocks as well as olive groves and oak tree forests. In the south the house has a spectacular terrace with a great view on the sea and with a low, broad parapet. Under the terrace is a further guest room with a bath and cellar. The living space has the atmosphere of a covered outside space and gets maximum glazing on the back too, which releases the view as contrast to the width of the sea on the bizarre rock landscape lying directly behind. Two large movable wall pieces let the living space with kitchen and bedroom become a large flowing area. Outside the oversized staircase dramatizes the hillside situation and connects the guest room and its separate terrace with the house in a generous gesture.

Draeger House, Corsica, by Philippe Stuebi Architekten Gmbh

C16H14O3 House by Marcio Kogan

“I have always admired Brazilian modernism that began in the 1930s. Incredible work was done by dozens of starchitects like Lucio Costa, Lina Bo Bardi, Oscar Niemeyer, Rino Levi and Affonso Reidy. It’s always surprising to me that in the early and mid-20th century, Brazil produced the projects that it did – so simple and elegant. A lesson for our superfluous world in crisis.”
- Marcio Kogan

Can’t get enough of Brazilian homes designed by of Marcio Kogan?
More Daily Icon posts: Panama House, Beach House, Casa Mirindiba, Osler House and Casa Corten.

C16H14O3 House, São Paulo, Brazil, by Marcio Kogan
via: Wallpaper*

Leis House by Peter Zumthor

Pritzker Prize winning architect, Peter Zumthor is often described as the “architect’s architect”. His rigorous approach and uncompromising attitude to every aspect of design and construction have resulted in a small number of perfectly formed buildings, the most famous of which are the Thermal Baths in Vals (1996). Many of his projects take several years to build, or fail to be built at all. He is best known for contemplative, elemental buildings and a careful style of working. He describes his method as being like that of US minimalist composer John Cage – an aleatoric process of conversation and reduction.

The wooden houses are built in the traditional Swiss regional style. The walls are composed of pine boards that are assembled, frame free, by tongue and groove. The height of the houses make the walls appear to be paper thin. Zumthor likes his structures to exude lightness and even fragility. All of the roofs of the region are obligated by law to use rough-hewn granite slabs for roof tiling. These roofs, require massive structures including one, or two central beams at the peak of the roof. Zumthor eliminates the central beam by pulling the frames together at their bases with steel rods in order to form the peak thus creating an empty space between the house and the roof.

Leis House, Leis, Switzerland, by Peter Zumthor via: The Art Blog

Books: Peter Zumthor: Thinking Architecture
In this book Peter Zumthor expresses his motivation in designing buildings that speak to our feelings and understanding in so many ways and that possess a powerful and unmistakable presence and personality. The book is illustrated throughout with colour photographs by Laura Padgett of Zumthor’s new home and studio in Haldenstein. This book has been described as “cult reading material for students and architects around the world”.
Buy it here: Amazon

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