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Goddard Mandolene Residence by Arthur Witthoefft

Todd Goddard and Andrew Mandolene have completed a restoration of the near-derelict 1957 home of architect Arthur Witthoefft. A few years ago, they were living in California modernist E. Stewart Williams’s 1957 Kenaston House, in Rancho Mirage, when they decided to move. They loved the West, but they loved mid-century architecture even more–and were prepared to relocate for it. Finding a house in the Los Angeles area equal to the Kenaston, a minor gem they’d impeccably restored, at an affordable price proved difficult. “So we decided to see what else was out there,” says Mandolene. “If there was something special, we would go for it.”

Arthur Witthoefft was an architect in the Manhattan office of corporate modernists Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, and his design was a lapidary example of Miesian simplicity: a 25-by-95-foot rectangle, composed of a black exposed-steel frame, front and northern elevations clad largely in white glazed brick, and southern and western exposures enclosed by floor-to-ceiling glass sliders.

Goddard Mandolene Residence, Armonk, New York, by Arthur Witthoeff, via: dwell

The Rechter House by Pitsou Kedem Architects

“…a personal and updated version of a private dwelling in the spirit of the modern era and in an international style. The final result of the architectural design and the new interior design is a reserved and cultured private home with human proportions and spaces that together form a strong and clear form, free of unnecessary decorations and designer “chit-chat” with a clean and moderate form and ideas, that reflect the architectural and social principals that are so difficult to find in today’s modern world.”

The Rechter House, by Pitsou Kedem Architects, for via: Arch daily

JD House by BAK Architects

BAK Architects have completed the JD House, located in the forest of Mar Azul, in the Argentinian province of Buenos Aires.

JD House, by BAK Architects via:Contemporist

Gravity is a Force to be Reckoned With by Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle

Madrid-born artist Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle’s latest work, Gravity is a Force to be Reckoned With, realizes one of Mies van der Rohe’s unbuilt projects–albeit upside-down. The installation is an inverted, replica of Mies’ 50×50 House project from 1951. The small, house is completely enclosed in glass, with black leather Barcelona chairs, glass-topped tables, and a wood partition, containing a kitchen with a small range, countertop and a French Press with a teaspoon.

Gravity is a Force to be Reckoned With, by Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle

Herzliya Home by Pitzo Kedem Architects

The house was built as a vacation home for a family living abroad. It is situated directly on the coast in the center of the country. The buildings architectural design is based on three central masses that surround a large internal courtyard with a swimming pool at its center. The masses comprise the border and the barrier between the street, the neighbors and the home’s interior and between the internal courtyard and those same spaces. The central theme was to create dynamic walls that allow, on the one hand, the elimination of the boundary between the central courtyard and the internal spaces, and on the other hand, the creation of a changing and dynamic facade that allows for the total closure of the façade or different levels of exposure or concealment.

The side the sea to the west, allows for a richer relationship between the exposed and the concealed. A partition created from six equal metal sections and adjustable wooden slats allows for the total closure of the façade or different levels of blurring between the inside and the outside. The dynamism of the large accordion doors and the adjustable wooden slats allows natural light that enters through them, to play a central role in the homes internal spaces and for the creation of geometrical displays of light against the vertical and horizontal areas and so enrich the material restraint in which the homes spaces are fashioned.

Herzliya Home, by Pitzo Kedem Architects, in Cooperation with Tanju Qzelgin, via: Arch Daily

Troxell Residence (Paseo Miramar) by Richard Neutra

Originally built in 1956, Richard Neutra’s Troxell Residence perched high above the Pacific Coast Highway underwent a rigorous renovation and expansion to 3,000 square feet. Hughes Umbanhowar Architects followed cues from the original post and beam structure over which interior and exterior finishes of wood, stone, plaster and glass are applied in a simple refined technique to refine the play of space, light and views. A pile supported pool and deck, included in the original plans but never executed, now clings to the natively planted hillside, defining the limit of expanded outdoor living space and void below. 3 bedrooms are located off a common corridor facing west to the hillside, making for consistent, calm morning light. A seamless addition to the master bedroom projects the house further out into space – reemphasizing the overall horizontal composition of the building. From this room and the open plan dining and sitting areas large expanses of fixed and sliding glass welcome framed panoramic views that include downtown Los Angeles and Catalina Island.

Troxell Residence (Paseo Miramar) by Richard Neutra, Pacific Palisades, California, Renovation by Hughes Umbanhowar Architects, Interior Design: Brad Dunning

ie-tag by Naruse Inokuma Architects

ie-tag was part of the exhibition, “Earth: materials for design,” which took place at the Miraikan in Tokyo over the summer. The post-its, created by Naruse Inokuma Architects, are made from the recycled wood of homes and buildings that were torn down. Once used as the material of a home, the wood was recycled into stationary, maintaining it’s original shape but in completely different form.

ie-tag (House Tag), by Naruse Inokuma Architects, via: Spoon and Tamago

Wallace K Harrison Estate Restoration by SchappacherWhite

Atop a hill on Long Island removed from the fog of the shoreline, architect Wallace K Harrison in the early 1930s purchased land to design a house for his wife and himself. However, after the purchase of the land, the young architect had inadequate funds to pay for construction. Then, while touring the annual Architectural League show in Grand Central Palace, he paid around $1000 for what many consider the first prefab home, the Aluminaire House designed by A. Lawrence Kocher and Albert Frey. In 1931, Harrison designed what he considered a summer-use extension to the “Tin House” adding a series of circles, “an exercise in how to fit circles together”.

Around 1940, the Tin House was relocated on the property and a second, linear wing with bathrooms and baths was added to the former circular forms. The Harrison Estate, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, represents the leading edge of the International Style. It has now undergone a complete restoration and expansion, designed by SchappacherWhite Ltd., that honors Harrison’s original design intent while satisfying the needs of a 21st century family. The Harrison Estate was a laboratory for ideas Harrison expressed in his architecture. The home’s signature element, the circle, is found in the forms of the living room, small former dining room, pool, and even concrete pavers used for walkways, all of which have been restored by SchappacherWhite. Spaces were winterized and built to today’s sustainable standards.

The Harrison house was not only a place for architectural exploration, but also a home for many artists and a canvas for site-specific works. In 1942, Fernand Leger, escaping the war in Europe, came to the house and painted a canvas for the large round living room and also painted figurative swimmers on the bottom of the circular swimming pool. Existing and restored is the only remaining Leger artwork, a skylight located at the new dining room. Amongst the many artists and friends whom enjoyed the house were Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Mary Callery, Robert Moses, and Le Corbusier.

Wallace K Harrison Estate, Restoration by SchappacherWhite, via: Arch Daily

Montauk Residence by Rees Roberts + Partners

With interiors that defer to the elements of art, light, and views, Rees Roberts + Partners creates spaces that are tailored to both the context of each location and the character of the individual. While inventive and informed by a well-rounded knowledge of architectural styles, the designs of the firm remain true to the practical realities and varied lifestyles of its clients. The Company is known for its innovative landscape design, and in particular, its skill in integrating the built structure with its natural environment.

Montauk Residence, by Rees Roberts + Partners

Pavilniai Family House by G. Natkevicius and Partners

In the Middle Ages, where the building is situated, was a cannon foundry. Client bought a site where stood the old yellow brick lodge with a basement. Cleaning the plaster of a house revealed that the lodge had been built by ancient bricks which were made in a old Vilnius brick factories. Because of a historical and physical value of a house were considered to preserve it by wrapping it with outer glass shape. The historical house structure have been carefully restored.

Family House, Pavilniai Regional Park by Architectural Bureau G. Natkevicius and Partners
via: archdaily

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