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maison L by Christian Pottgiesser Architecturespossibles

Located half an hour’s drive west of Paris, the roughly 5000 m2 plot of old trees called for a design that would leave the spacious grounds predominantly untouched. The project works with a pre-existing 18th century orangery, a conservatory-like building with a seven-meter high ceiling line on the northern part of the site. to disturb the ground as little as possible, ‘maison L’ extends 50 m to the north-west to line the boundary, resulting in a general ‘L’-shaped plan. Considering the natural topography of the site, the house is buried up to two meters below grade with a garden roof covering the ground storey. this main level remains largely open and connected, with varying degrees of privacy depending on the depth of the zone’s placement. five three-storied tower-like volumes puncture through the green roof to stand almost autonomously with the main level. positioned to frame a specific perspective of the site, each tower houses a dressing room, storage space, a mezzanine, bathroom and a bedroom.

maison L, France, by Christian Pottgiesser Architecturespossibles, via: designboom

DMH Residence by MIM Design

This project distinguishes between old and new with a clean, timeless interior renovation melding with a classic Victorian character. The Victorian features throughout the home have been simplified to a clean, fresh palette whilst maintaining all of the existing elements. The requirements of a modern family home are demonstrated through the simple extended height and open feel of the renovation. The interior furnishings work in conjunction with the space to create an elegant, timeless, fresh feel.

DMH Residence, Australia by MIM Design, via: Contemporist

Azibi by Atelier d’Architecture Bruno Erpicum & Partners

A land without any view, except 3 meters above the level of the ground: the living room is organised at the first floor and is surrounded by a glazed facade in order to catch a panoramic view to the see and the old city. The access to the first floor is organised with a smouth ramp, an internal walk in the forest.

Azibi, Spain, by Atelier d’Architecture Bruno Erpicum & Partners

Studio SC by Marcio Kogan StudioMK27

A staple trademark of Marcio Kogan’s designs are elongated rectilinear openings which we also experience here with the Studio SC project. The use of wood, metal, stone, and concrete come into play and complemented with pops of color from the unique furniture pieces. In true MK27 form, the space has a large opening into a natural environment, letting sunlight reach in and vegetation act as a focal point. In the warm months employees can bring out a little table and enjoy work outside but still within their space.

Studio SC, by StudioMK27, via: KNSTRCT

House in Melides by Pedro Reis

The house in Melides, on the southern Alentejo Coast, by Pedro Reis, represents the desire for a holiday house as a getaway from the bustle of a big city. The client made the unusual decision to have an architectural competition between three distinct ateliers, allowing a choice from a wider range of possible solutions. This winning proposal presents a reading of the “drama” of the natural countryside, building it on top of a steep hill relatively protected by the surrounding “rugged topography”.

House in Melides, Grândola, Portugal, by Pedro Reis, Photography by FG+SG – Fernando Guerra, Sergio Guerra
via: arch daily

eHouse by Axelrod Architects

eHouse is a single family house that borrows from two traditions in architecture — a Mediterranean aesthetic of sun and light and a minimalist discipline of line and plane. The design exhibits a masterful use of that most modern of materials, concrete. The core of the house, both conceptually and structurally, is several vertical and horizontal planes. Conceptually, the vertical planes define the axes of the house and the horizontal planes the spatial volume. Structurally, the concrete elements support every other architectural surface, predominantly glass and drywall. The extensive use of glass allows that most Mediterranean element, sunlight, to permeate into every room. Whether, direct, indirect, or filtered, light fills this house. Many smaller glazed areas reveal hidden views of exterior garden. A large 14 meter expanse of glass floods the main living/dining/kitchen area with daylight. The entire 14 meter window system can even be rolled back to create one super room of indoor and outdoor space. In plan, the house is defined by two axes; one running lengthwise through the main living space and one perpendicular from the main entrance to the staircase. The longitudinal axis is reflected in the roof plane with a long skylight that runs the entire length of the house. The transverse axis is punctuated with a dramatic front entrance of horizontal wooden slats and cantilevered canopy.

eHouse, Israel by Axelrod Architects, via: Arch Daily

Gentlemen’s Club Office by SHH

Pool tables, free beer and “casual everyday” dress code may have become the desired and appropriate work environment in many companies, but for some, a gentlemen’s club atmosphere works better. London-based architecture and design firm SHH created this elegant office in London for an international investment company. The offices are located in a five-storey Georgian townhouse connected to a two-storey mews by a partially covered walkway. Several marble-inlaid fireplaces, marble mosaic floor tiles and beautiful ceiling cornices were kept from the previous occupants but the rest underwent a thorough modernization.

The resulting milieu is imposing and somewhat intimidating. Its dark, black-and-white photography vibe harkens back to some secret storied past, yet the contemporary treatments, especially the dramatic lighting pieces return the thoughts back to today. Some of the light fixtures are by Modular and Foscarini and the statement chandeliers were custom-designed by Michael Anastassiades. Custom-work, limited-edition pieces and classic furnishings such as Eames Lobby chairs accent each space, giving stunning jolts among the calm opulence.

A Gentlemen’s Club Office, London by SHH, via: The Cool Hunter

Architectural Record House David Jameson Architect Inc.

Four decades after their project was featured in the 1969 Record Houses issue of Architectural Record, the owners sold the house to a young couple. A condition of the sale was that the new owners would respect the character of the project, yet be able to revisit and alter the contained quality of the interior rooms to create a continuous living space visually connected to the woodland site. An analysis of the existing structure revealed ordering devices through which the new work could be understood. A truss roof system allowed interior walls to be eradicated, yielding a condition of an unencumbered public and private pavilion linked together by a glass entry node. Floor to ceiling window apertures relating the pavilions could not be experienced within the original floor plan. Registering the new work to the existing house is a conceptual allee of walnut casework. The casework weaves together and provides clarity to the various living areas. The quarter sawn casework and flat sawn flooring employ walnut in a Chiascuro manner, creating bold contrasts to the existing white painted brick walls and plaster ceiling. Corian casework elements are positioned as kitchen, mudroom, and bath objects, further juxtaposing a smoothness to the textural brick and plaster. The purity of the original brick fireplace and skylight ring at the center of the house is exposed and left uninterrupted, allowing for additional connection to the site.

Record House, USA Revisited, David Jameson Architect Inc., Photography by Paul Warchol
via: Arch Daily

Icon: Hagerty House by Walter Gropius

When the Hagerty House was built in 1938 along the rocky coastline of Cohasset, Massachusetts, the stodgy Yankee neighbors were appalled. The minimalist International Style structure may have sat in sharp contrast to the area’s traditional shingle, Federalist, and Greek Revival architecture, but it helped blaze a trail for the modern century to come. The story of the home begins in 1937, when Walter Gropius, the pioneering founder of Germany’s Bauhaus and a recent émigré to the United States, accepted a teaching position at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. After coming under increasing attack from the Nazi regime for his non-conformist, left-leaning ideas and spending almost three years in England with the modernist Isokon group, Gropius, with his wife, Ise, relocated to Cambridge, Massachusetts. At Harvard, Gropius would exert a profound influence over the minds of a generation of architects whose work would shape America’s built environment for decades to come.

Hagerty House, by Walter Gropius, via: dwell

Villa Amanzi by Original Vision

The defining elements are the rock and the view. They dominate at every juncture. They resonate on first approach, through the migration from public to private space, in the living and in the family areas, in the gardens, in the bedrooms; and they continue to command respect down the tropical jungle steps that arrive at a secluded rock platform, flanked by the same seam that welcomed you 60m above. Constant reference to these elements instills a feeling of solidity that contrasts with the openness of the house, reinforcing the dynamism and vibrancy that pays homage to the magic of the location.

The home grows out from the rock; the bedroom element rests between it and the wing that strikes the perpendicular, rising vertically from the slope. This composition defines the open living and dining space that is simply a transition between two garden areas. It is intimate but open and the uninterrupted clear span creates a bridge under which the conventions defining indoor space disappear.

Villa Amanzi, Phuket, Thailand, by Original Vision, via: archdaily

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