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Bridge House by Höweler + Yoon Architecture

The Bridge House addresses the condition of views and the wooded landscape. It is composed of three volumetric elements: the bedroom volume, the living volume, and a bar of bedrooms that spans between the first two. The space at the ground floor between the volumes is enclosed with glass and will house entrance and living areas. The void between volumes frames views of the landscape, but also allows the landscape to slide through the house- allowing the inside and outside to blur. The composition of rectilinear elements allows each to remain legible, while producing a fourth implied volume between them. The fourth space is an “outdoor” room, momentarily “held” between the others and extending out into the landscape.

Bridge House, Virginia, United States, by Höweler + Yoon Architecture

KOU-AN Glass Tea House by Tokujin Yoshioka

This project originates in the architecture plan of the Transparent Japanese House, first presented in 2002. The structure sits alongside the Shoren-in Temple, which was built during the Heian period between 794 and 1185. The idea has been developed into a transparent teahouse, an architectural project incorporating a symbolic Japanese cultural image – to host elaborate tea ceremonies. The tea houses’s roof is made up of overlapping glass planes, supported by a slender steel framework featuring a mirrored surface that camouflages with the glass.

KOU-AN Glass Tea House, Kyoto, Japan by Tokujin Yoshioka
Photography by Yasutake Kondo

Hopetoun Road Residence by b.e architecture

The approach for the renovation and extension of the Hopetoun Road Residence is to retain the existing structure as an anchoring element, adding a series of pavilions underneath a floating copper roofline that wraps around the original building. Embracing the client’s desire to maintain a fairly conventional residential structure, the design strengthens the form by creating a gable façade at the front and back with a clearly defined outline. Clad in polished grey render, the gables emphasize solidity and give the house a re-established sense of history and permanence.

In contrast the extensions, composed as ribbons of copper wrapping around the solid structure, sit softly above recessed glazing. As a counterpoint to the verticality of the façade, the thin, single-level roofline expresses horizontality. The copper banding creates various spatial experiences as it interacts with the original house. The tension and balance between old and new are carried into the interiors of the house. The existing structure maintains the intimate qualities of the original house with a series of crafted details. The new areas, made primarily from glass, are open to the green landscape beyond. Prominent use of steel-framed windows is a unifying element throughout the project.

Hopetoun Road Residence, Melbourne, Australia, by b.e architecture

Photography: Brasilia by Øystein Aspelund

Brasilia was built out on the brazilian savannah in four year during the 60s, based upon a masterplan made by Lúcio Costa. Most of the important buildings are designed by the brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer. The lay out of the urban plan resembles an airplane, containing two main axes with the main governmental functions in what would be the “cockpit” of the plane. The pilot plan with its huge open spaces, buildings, streets and public squares was meant to be represent an ideal city of future, true to the ideals of modernistic city planning of that time. Today Brasilia stands out as a well planned utopian future city from the past. Whatever the conclusion might be on the urban planning, the collection of buildings stands out as an impressive work of modern architecture.

Brasilia, by Øystein Aspelund

Oak Knoll Residence by Aidlin Darling Design

Perched on a hilltop with sweeping views of a valley below, the tendrils of this new house unravel between the existing oak trees to create a complex layering of architecture and landscape. Punctuated by a single, quiet tower, the balance of the new construction is rendered in small, single-story volumes that rest carefully beneath the tree canopy. Exterior courtyards and interior spaces are sculpted with a similar language and scale, blurring the boundary between building and site.

Oak Knoll Residence, by Aidlin Darling Design

San Joaquin Valley Residence by Aidlin Darling Design

A meandering stream collides with the rigid geometry of orchards to provide a setting for this rural residence. It is comprised of earthen masses which bracket the landscape and protect the interior from intense southern sun. The resultant open space is used for living, cooking and dining. A cantilevered roof gathers the space, making inside and out feel as one. Concrete, steel, reclaimed wood and water are employed to enhance the connection between building, landscape, and the surrounding agricultural vernacular.

San Joaquin Valley Residence, by Aidlin Darling Design

A House Surrounded By A Pine Forest by Ramon Esteve

Some prismatic volumes come out from the four stone sidewalls, thus enclosing the space and differentiating each room. The area between the rooms is covered by a timber roof acting as a hall and a connector. The opening sequence of the gaps of the home located in a residential area surrounded by large pine forest reflects the hierarchical order of the outdoor areas. The aim of the proposal is the creation of different outdoor areas linked to the rooms inside, according to their level of privacy. Each room is differently high according to its use and spreads its program on a single level, except for the bedrooms’ bay. This operation generates a cross-shaped plan that arranges the external space. The materials, together with the raking light from a longitudinal roof light, produce a warm and cosy atmosphere. The timber volume works as a connector and distributor of the different rooms, and at the same time opens to all the outdoor areas. The volumes containing the living room, the dining room and the kitchen, however independents, are visually linked because of their position, making the house wider and more transparent. The other two volumes host the main bedroom, two bedrooms on the lower floor and a studio on the upper floor. A continuous veranda enlarge the rooms, generating outdoor areas that open and extend the rooms.

A House Surrounded By A Pine Forest, Valencia, Spain, by Ramon Esteve
Photography by Mariela Apollonio

AN House by Guilherme Torres

Divided into three blocks – two downstairs and one that forms the upper deck – forming a “U”, they organize social area, the lounge and intimate area on an impactful way. The volumes of the ground are exposed concrete, in contrast with the white brickwork of the rooms. Fully closed to the street, the lobby was organized in a large wooden box, like a theater stage. The coating continuity between the door and the walls leaves completely open and camouflaged through an electronic system.
The inner hall follows the same finish in Cumaru wood and lighting have stemmed from a large domus. The circulation is organized behind the single wall of the dining room, which hides the circulation between the hall and the staircase. In the living there is a strong contrasts between the exposed concrete, wood and marble, which opens up to the recreation area. The pool is surrounded by a large wooden deck, which creates a junction with the recreation area, equipped with gourmet kitchen and a home theater. In opposite side to the living area, the volume of concrete with wooden brise soleils gives place to a guest room and to a recreation area.

AN House, Sao Paulo, Brazil, by Guilherme Torres
Photography by Denilson Machado

Montee Karp Residence by Patrick Tighe Architecture

The 2200 sq. ft. residence is located on a severe hillside site in Malibu overlooking the Pacific Ocean. The project is an extensive remodel of an existing post-and-beam home in need of a structural, programmatic and environmental upgrade. The residence is re-envisioned for the 21st century. The existing roof geometry is accentuated creating a language of faceted surfaces. The articulated volume of the building’s front facade extends indoors to define the interior spaces, resulting in a dematerialization of the roof, wall and floor planes. A forced perspective is created, framing the extraordinary views out to the Santa Monica Bay. The minimal, gallery-like living space is designed to accommodate the client’s extensive collection of contemporary art. Display niches, lighting and the configuration of the spaces are planned to enhance the experience of viewing the art. The stair has cantilevering steel treads, each with a custom laser-cut pattern. Light from the skylight above filters through the perforated stair to project an ever-changing texture of shadow and light, enlivening the walls and floor. A grand entry door made of a stainless steel tube frame marks the threshold into the relatively small house. The 10’ high door makes use of a hydraulic pivot and a concealed magnetic locking device.

Montee Karp Residence, California, USA , by Patrick Tighe Architecture
Photography by Art Gray and Bran Arifin

Cut Paw Paw by Andrew Maynard Architects

Cut Paw Paw is a renovation and extension to a double fronted weatherboard home. At one end is living/kitchen/dinning while at the other end is a music studio. Between is a deck, garden, paving and bathtub. Parts of the garden creep into internal spaces. Parts of the floor spilling into the garden. The entire structure runs along the southern boundary, therefore the house now faces north. Sun and shadow dances through the frame throughout the day, passively warming the house in winter, while keeping it cool in summer, which makes it energy efficient.

Cut Paw Paw, Victoria, Australia, by Andrew Maynard Architects
Photography by Peter Bennetts and Tess Kelly

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