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Flynn Mews House by LOHA

Located in the heart of Dublin, Ireland, the Flynn Mews House seamlessly integrates into and celebrates its historic urban fabric. Sharing ground with an 1847 coach house, the design for this residence highlights and reframes the site through an unabashedly contemporary gesture that honors history while adding to it a distinctly new architectural strain.

This home engages with the historic core of Dublin in a uniquely intimate way. With its main entrance by way of a small mews, or alley, the site’s historic coach house façade was restored and incorporated into the new structure so that unobstructed views from the original manor remain unspoiled.

The house comprises two volumes that flank an interior sunken courtyard, creating a dynamic sequencing of exterior and interior spaces that is atypical in urban Dublin.This staggering of two masses best resolves the challenge of highlighting the preserved wall. Overlooking the interstitial courtyard, the historic façade is reflected across the contemporary glazed forms that surround it. A contemporary glass bridge is suspended across the central void.

As part of the Dublin Green Building Pilot Program, the house utilizes sustainable measures achieved through a holistic design approach: recycled and high performance materials, solar panels for domestic water heating, and radiant floors heated by an underground pump system that incorporates gray water. The Flynn Mews House was completed with an Irish firm, ODOS, providing services as executive architect during its construction documents and administration phases.

Flynn Mews House, Dublin, Ireland, by Lorcan O’ Herlihy Architects
Photography by Enda Cavanagh, Alice Clancy

MR House by Luciano Kruk Arquitectos

MR House, Costa Esmeralda, Buenos Aires, Argentina, by Luciano Kruk Arquitectos
Photography by Daniela Mac Adden

White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects

White Cave House is a massive lump engraved by a series of voids interconnected in the shape of a kinked tube. The connection of voids – we call it Cave – is the theme of this house. Internal rooms are designed to enjoy the minimum views of Cave characterized by its whiteness. At the same time, this concept is also the practical solution to realize a courtyard house in Kanazawa city known for heavy snow in Japan.

The client’s original request was a white minimally-designed house with many external spaces, such as a large snow-proof approach to the entrance, a roofed garage for multiple cars, a terrace facing to the sky, and a courtyard. Though a roofed entrance and a garage are desirable for snowy place, it takes so many floor areas away from the internal rooms for the family, while the space and the budget is limited. In addition, courtyard style itself is not suitable to the snowy country because courtyards would be easily buried under snow.
To solve the problems, we proposed to connect these external spaces one another into a large single tube, or Cave, and have each part serve multiple purposes in order to make up for the space limitations. We designed Cave unstraight because it prevents passengers outside from seeing through, though it is not closed. By this arrangement, Cave takes a new turn for each part letting in the sunshine while protecting privacy of the courtyard, the terrace, and the internal rooms. The family inside can enjoy the view of Cave changing its contrast throughout a day under the sunshine. Cave also serves as a route to remove snow from the external spaces in winter, otherwise you would be at a loss with a lot of snow in the enclosed courtyard.

In order to make Cave deserve its name more, we wondered if we could add the reflection of water to the house because we thought water is inseparable from white caves. We eventually figured out that the terrace was an appropriate site to place it. The terrace covered by white waterproof FRP holds a thin layer of water like a white basin. On the terrace reflecting the skyview without obstacles, you may feel that Cave has brought you to another world far from the daily life.

White Cave House, by Takuro Yamamoto Architects

Okinawa House by John Pawson

The site for this family home is a 414sqm cliff-top plot on the island of Okinawa, where the clients wish to spend their summer and winter holidays. As they live in a box-shaped house in Tokyo, the brief was for somewhere with a sense of vertical and horizontal expansiveness and the fluidity of the catenary curve came up as a visual reference. The design traces the diagonal footprint of the plot, combining single and double-height spaces within a form that is closed and tapered to the rear, but to the front flares and opens like an eye over the headland, with the ground floor level raised to optimise sightlines to the ocean.

Okinawa House, by John Pawson
Photography by Nacasa & Partners

Shulman Home and Studio by LOHA

LOHA’s restoration and modernization applies contemporary measures of performance and design to a historic building, enhancing its continued life as an exceptional family residence.

The Julius Shulman Home and Studio was originally commissioned by photographer Julius Shulman, designed by Raphael Soriano, and completed in 1950. It is one of twelve remaining built Soriano projects, the only with an unaltered steel frame, and a City of Los Angeles Historic–Cultural Monument. LOHA was engaged to not simply restore the significant home, but to update the space so that it could meet the specific needs of a young family.

For this project, LOHA undertook extensive research into the materiality and design intentions of the original structure, as well as other buildings from the period. As a notable landmark, the Shulman Home was restored under strict preservation guidelines supervised by the Los Angeles Office of Historical Resources. Due to the home’s status as a residence and not a museum, LOHA was granted more flexibility in upgrading the residence with essential contemporary features and important amenities. LOHA’s sensitive and light approach brought out the timeless nature of the Soriano’s elegant design.

Shulman Home and Studio, by LOHA, via Plastolux, Photography by Iwan Baan
Buy the book: Julius Shulman Photographer of Modernism

Arboretum House by Bruns Architecture

Designed as a peaceful dwelling amid an opus of bird songs, Arboretum House grows out of its forested site within the diverse landscape of the University of Wisconsin Arboretum neighborhood as a cultivated collection of forms that combine to create an architectural ecosystem.

Arboretum House, by Bruns Architecture
Photography by Tricia Shay Photography

Casa dos Claros by Contaminar Arquitectos

Single-family house with two stories – ground floor and basement – designed by Contaminar atelier, located between the rural area surrounding the Lis River and the urban periphery of the city of Leiria. Positioned on a small plot, this house is located in a small-scale chaotic urban area, surrounded by greenhouses and cropland. Occupying the entirety of the space, the house itself represents the borders of the plot, living around small patios. These in turn provide privacy and transport the user to a different type of space with a more introspective atmosphere, creating a composition of occupied and empty spaces on the plan and elevations.

The general geometry of the house, which appears to be rigid, is interrupted by circular openings that afford a poetic aspect to the spaces. The various axes are based on a 3,5 x 3,5 metres grid, organizing and providing discipline to the space. In the centre there is a patio that extends to the basement, delineating the separation of the social and private areas on the upper floor. In the more private area, another patio separates the suite from the other rooms.

Adjacent to the kitchen is a third patio lined with sucupira wood, interacting with the exterior and creating a permeating effect between the inside and outside spaces. The same effect is achieved with the suite patio, as the spaces are hybrid, distinct and comfortable.
The two central patios of the house converge through a unique garden space in the basement, interacting with the gym space and a social space. Part of this garden extends to a mid-floor level and creates the separation between another patio and the basement, reserved for more technical functionalities. The basement space is characterized by the presence of concrete and zenith lighting, creating a more dramatic atmosphere.

Casa dos Claros, Leiria, Portugal, by Contaminar Arquitectos
Photography by Fernando Guerra

Tropical Beach House by Renato D’Ettorre Architects

A small one bedroom beach house. The primary design elements are shutters made out of low-maintenance native hardwoods that will age and eventually blend in with the surrounding tropical landscape.

Tropical Beach House, Far North Queensland, Australia, by Renato D’Ettorre Architects
Photography by Willem Rethmeier

Platypus by Robinson Architects

Platypus House, Noosa Hinterland, by Robinson Architects

Azuris by Renato D’Ettorre Architects

The design of the house responds to its spectacular location near the edge of the ocean and its site falling steeply away towards the water’s edge on hamilton island. Simple, clean spaces are carved out of robust masonry, ensuring longevity and low future maintenance in the sub-tropical climate. The design philosophy is based upon the emphasis on the eternal elements of sun, sea and air in combination with the materials’ textural quality and honesty which makes the house invisible from the surrounds. Internal spaces wrap themselves around water and courtyards, capturing not only ocean views but also inward looking private vistas.

Azuris, Hamilton Island, Australia, by Renato D’Ettorre Architects

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