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Studio GT SP by Studio Guilherme Torres

This house is an original construction of the 40s, it belonged to a great Brazilian artist, Victor Brecheret, the man behind great references in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. After the artist’s death, the property has never been occupied and during decades it served as a foundation of part of his collection and a deposit. The architect Guilherme Torres was immediately attracted by its compact size (130 m²) and the privileged location in one of the most charming streets in the Jardins neighborhood in São Paulo.

The main concept was to update the building, reflecting the contemporary language of the newcomer. The floor plan has not suffered many changes. The only things that has been changed over were the gaps, openings and coatings. All the walls were covered with drywalls and received in some parts white paint and in others, a coating that resembles cement texture. Up the stairs, from the original construction, you can see an art piece of Pinky Wainer, also responsible for the façade neon with the say: ‘land of the free, home of the brave’. The master suite’s toilet is connected to a mezzanine above the kitchen where a bath tub was created. A retractable glass roof can be opened on summer days, to help leaving a mild climate. To soften the rays of sun, a wooden muxarabie, a registered trademark of the architect, was used as a covering following the same pattern of the front door of the house.

The architect chose this property to live and work. With just over 30 years and works in broad expansion, Guilherme Torres is considered one of the great names of Brazilian architecture. Coming from the interior of Paraná state, Brazil, where he established his first office serving many cities of Brazil for 10 years. Guilherme wanted to translate in his own new space, the best way of a cosmopolitan life with a hint of pop. The Studio Guilherme Torres moves from style to style developing architecture and interior projects and also signs a furniture line. The architecture receives timeless traits, a result of Guilherme’s admiration to the Escola Paulista de Arquitetura Modernista, which had its heyday in the 60s and 70s. For interiors the tendency is always to reflect the inquietude of our days. And design is a perfect match between both styles. One can simply look to the house owner to understand the symbiosis between creation and creature. Guilherme is a lover of street art, electronic music and loves to create new tattoos for himself, and it is inside this cauldron of references where he receives his clients and friends.

Studio GT SP, São Paulo, Brazil, by Studio Guilherme Torres, via: Archilovers

Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture

The design for the Caterpillar House, sited on the softly rolling hills of the Santa Lucia Preserve, sought to accentuate a connection to the land. Having lived in a Cliff May home, the client came to the project with a love of modern ranch houses and looking for an environmentally-conscious response to a beautiful site. The Caterpillar House implements sustainable elements while exploring a contemporary version of the ranch ideals: massing that is low and horizontal, an open plan with a strong connection between indoor and outdoor spaces, and main living areas which center informally on the kitchen.

Connecting literally and figuratively to the site, excavated earth was repurposed for the construction of the walls. These rammed earth walls gently curve in response to the site’s contours and also act as a thermal mass, regulating temperatures from day to night. Capturing rainwater for irrigation, three tanks proudly sit close to the home — a clear sign of the available water resources for landscape. Large south-facing glass doors open the main living area to a large covered contemporary porch and to an outdoor patio with sunshades that expand and contract to allow for a flexible entertaining area that responds to the client’s needs.

The glazing, natural ventilation and operable shading also act as a passive heating and cooling system, cooling the house in the summer and warming the house in winter. Integrated photovoltaic panels enable the house to produce all of its energy requirements without compromising the graceful curve of the low roof against the hill. The Caterpillar House is the first Leed Platinum Custom Home of the Central Coast.

Caterpillar House, Carmel, California, USA, by Feldman Architecture
Photography © Joe Fletcher, via: ArchDaily

House in Aroeira by Aires Mateus

Due to the absence of fences, the hexagonal shape of the plot is not clear and the ground blends with the surrounding pinewoods. The house occupies the maximal area of construction, concentric to the six-sided plot. Disposed round a courtyard to which every space converges, its peculiar form finds a precise boundary in the outline of a canopy. Service areas provide geometry and stability to the main spaces.

House in Aroeira, Portugal, by Aires Mateus
Photography by Fernando Guerra, via: Yatzer

D10 House by Werner Sobek

Located near Ulm in southern Germany, D10 is a single-storey one-family home built in an established residential area. A private driveway provides access to the house. Two parallel shear walls are a distinguishing feature of the building. Generously designed glazing serves to provide a spatial enclosure. Protected by an extensively projecting flat roof a generously sized patio encircling the house serves to unite the indoor space with the outdoor space. Access to the building is also gained via this patio.

The living areas are located on the ground floor, whilst the ancillary rooms are housed in the basement. The building is adjoined on the north side by a double-garage, which can be accessed directly from the basement. A stairway in the living room provides access inside the house.

D10, Stuttgart, Germany, by Werner Sobek, Photography by Zooey Braun

LaFetra Beach House by Pierre Koenig

When the Gantert Residence in the Hollywood Hills hit the market last fall, it was frequently described as the last built house designed by Pierre Koenig, who’s most famous for his Case Study Houses Nos. 21 and 22 (aka the Stahl House). The Gantert has just been bumped–sort of. For years, Serial mid-century modern collector/preservationist Michael LaFetra has talked about his plans to build a Koenig design on a beachfront lot in Malibu that was once occupied by a Pia Zadora-owned spec house. In fact, he bought that land in 1999, before even his first major modern acquisition, CSH No. 21. Shortly after buying 21, he got a call from Koenig, according to a 2005 LA Times article, and they became friends. In 2000 Koenig offered to build LaFetra a beach house. The house has just been finished, but Koenig died in 2004.

According to the old LAT story, “The plan Koenig ultimately came up with called for a house built from a massive steel-and-glass grid, with living space on the first two floors and three bedrooms on the top level. The entire wall facing the ocean would be made of transparent glass. Although LaFetra asked for polished concrete and cork floors in place of the vinyl tile Koenig favored, in most other ways the house would adhere to Koenig’s spare style. It would have an open floor plan and would be finished with Sheetrock and painted steel.”

LaFetra Beach House, Malibu, California, by Pierre Koenig, via: Curbed LA, and Los Angeles Times

Photography: Centro Niemeyer by Danica Ocvirk Kus

Centro Niemeyer is a new cultural complex in Avilés, and is part of an ambitious scheme to redevelop the riverfront. Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer, designed the complex as a gift to the principality.

Centro Niemeyer, Avilés, Spain, by Oscar Niemeyer, Photography © Danica Ocvirk Kus

Xiao-Yen’s House by Craig Steely Architecture

The extensive remodel of the house began by tearing away the substandard remodeling that had taken place over the past 100 years and replacing it with spaces more appropriate to the client’s program. These included a more open plan for work and living, a sod roof, and a glass penthouse with the roof supported by a steel exoskeleton. The steel exoskeleton is part of a seismic upgrade that doesn’t tear the existing building apart. It also supports decks on 2 floors and a pack a bi-facial solar panels.

Xiao-Yen’s House by, Craig Steely Architecture

Clearview Residence by Altius Architecture

Designed for a local artist to enjoy, this residence is located just south of Collingwood, in the heart of the Clearview area. A broad selection of sustainable technologies, including a geothermal lake loop and green house set this project apart from others in the area. The building itself draws inspiration from a number of intimate relationships and views, both through the adjacent woodland, as well as across the nearby pond.

The buildings programme is pretty extensive and with the clients desire to maintain the majority of this over one level the design team were particularly aware of the need to integrate the building into its surroundings in a subtle manor. Consequently this quickly became one of our main focuses and thus gave the scheme real direction, as we sought to arrange each space appropriately within the overall layout so to take advantage of the site and its beauty as well as to make sure that the building was as user friendly and functional as possible.

Clearview Residence, Clearview, Ontario, Canada, by Altius Architecture

Mies van der Rohe Gas Station Conversion by Les Architectes FABG

Heritage status defined the transformation of the modern architect’s only service station into an intergenerational community centre. It was necessary to cover and then restore the building, while allowing for integrating new mechanical equipment and power without affecting the heritage the building. The architectural interventions try to radicalize the inherent qualities of building by accentuating the formal simplicity, the continuity of the roof and transparency of the pavilions.

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe Gas Station, Nun’s Island, Montreal, Quebec, Conversion by Les Architectes FABG

House C:Z by SAMI-arquitectos

This house aims to overlook the various views which can be seen from the highest point of the land. Starting from a set of separate volumes and following the adaptation of the traditional architecture to the terrain, the resulting area between the four volumes was designed as a living space, the walls of which are a continuation of the exterior façades and where only glass separates the exterior from the interior space of the home. Depending on the prevailing wind or the desired view, the house can open out on various landscapes and its connection and permeability with the exterior is total. The solid volume in darkened wood is transformed into four volumes when the large glass panes are opened, allowing the extension of the various platforms of the house. A system of pre-fabrication was used for this building which was conceived in order to achieve an A+ rating in terms of energy efficiency.

House C:Z, São Roque do Pico, Ilha do Pico, Açores, Portugal, by Inês Vieira da Silva, Miguel Vieira, SAMI-arquitectos, Photography © FG + SG architectural photography, Fernando Guerra, via: ArchDaily

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