Quantcast

Follow Daily Icon

Email Address:

Townhouse Oberwall by apool

The found structure of an unfinished townhouse within the context of the urban development of central Berlin Friedrichswerder is based on the guidelines “planwerk innenstadt” was radical reconsidered and dismantled. The material of the facade, glossy white aluminium panels, highlights the significance of the abstraction and the vertical aspect of the project. You don’t need any outdoor advertising to highlight the flagship store – the facade is the advertising. The fully glazed entrance door to the shop is 6.5 meters high as the building is wide. Within the tight restrictions of a deep and narrow lot, the house achieves generosity through ceiling height. the qualities of natural light and space are more important than the optimisation of surface area and flexibility. The house will be used as a flagship store for the owners fashion label and their second home, the radical simplicity connects the different
aspects of use and creates a clear unit in a diversified neighbourhood.

Townhouse Oberwall, Oberwallstrasse, Berlin, Germany, by apool

City House by Architex

This inner city home is designed for a single client as a retreat from a busy professional life. The 400 m2 site was purchased with an approved Resource Consent for a family home – and so a revised brief was developed to fit into the approved envelope. The site is developed to its maximum both visually and physically, with a play on transparency and the flow of spaces from in to out. A variety of outdoor rooms complement the bold pavilion forms. They are linked by a circulation gallery – which also creates an axial focus for the full length of the site on entry. The street pavilion has the potential to become two guest rooms which share a bathroom and lounge area. The rear pavilion is private and contains an indulgent main bedroom suite. Sliding glass panels disappear into pockets to create open balconies for living and sleeping, and focus on the central courtyard as their oasis. The street facade is particularly private with only a hint of the sophistication that lies beyond in the selection of colour and materials.

City House, Auckland, New Zealand, by Architex, Photography © Simon Devitt

Southern House by Fergus Scott Architecture

The ‘brow of the hill’ is hard exposed rust brown essexite and the house follows the contour here and sweeps through 270 degrees of coastal landscape. A sunlit courtyard and terrace are contained within the outline of the building. They combine with thick walls and alcoves to offer protection from the south for year round outside living.

Southern House, by Fergus Scott Architecture

Casa Cubo by StudioMK27

Casa Cubo, Sao Paulo, Brazil, by StudioMK27, Photography © Fernando Guerra

Neubau Atelierhaus by Fabi Architekten

The house consists of two building volumes: a homogeneous, black saddle roof structure – turned on a cantilevered flat roof white box. Minimal intrusion into the hillside topography. The body of each open toward the natural space.

Neubau Atelierhaus, Wenzenbach, Germany, by Fabi Architekten

BF House by OAB + ADI

This home is on a plot of 3,000sqm with a height of 25m, in a Castellón neighborhood that is only 50% constructed. Looking at the plot, we see that it reflectsits seventeenth century history, which is when overpopulation forced the cultivation of all types of terrain, including those that are very steep, through a system of small terraces with walls made of local rock. The later abandonment allowed the growth of trees, mainly pine and carob. Our position towards the plot was that of absolute respect, so the construction method should also respect the land, thus us opting for a prefabricated building system that is deposited on the land practically without touching it, without cutting down trees, and taking advantage of existing terrace/garden areas, which were rebuilt in the damaged areas, with the same stone and same technique. Part of the house — garage and auxiliary areas — is buried, allowing us to re-introduce native vegetation on the natural terrain. This also allows the plot to be accessedon the upper levelby forklift from a ramp that enters the garage located 13ml under the access level that communicates with both of the home’s levels. All of this is hidden from view. For construction, in trying to lessen the impact on the ground, we chose a metal structure fabricated in a workshop and transported to the site in large pieces that could be assembled on 3 metal, V-shaped pillars. An existing stone terrace supports the back part of the structure.

This home looks as though suspended or in flight due to the dry construction materials used. The façade, resulting in various layers, is finished on the outside with corrugated sheet metal, specially designed to prevent glare and heat, thanks to the shadows caused by the folds. The great front opening is oriented towards magnificent views, and allows adequate sunlight in during the winter, but also protects from the sun in the summer. The solar energy panels with heat pipe technology on the roof allow the home to guarantee that at almost any moment, there will always be hot water available for both domestic use and for under-floor heating. Air currents cross the patio, taking advantage of the different orientations, which permits reductions in air conditioning consumption, which, in any case, has been installed.

The intermediate courtyard allows access under the house, and at the same time, allows all the rooms to face the sun and the views. The whole house revolves around this courtyard. This is a house with a courtyard, but with different connotations since each room in the house can be seen from the courtyard’s central location, as well as the surrounding landscape, and since the courtyard is surrounded on four sides by the house, but is not enclosed by it due to the slope of the plot. In the large front area, which houses the kitchen, living room and master bedroom, the construction system is evident since the pillars and roof structure, formed by metal brackets supporting a corrugated sheet over which the roof is built, can be seen.

BF House, Borriol, Castellón de la Plana, Spain, by OAB + ADI
Photography © Joan Guillamat, via: ArchDaily

House in Villarcayo by Pereda Pérez Arquitectos

The starting point of the project answers to two clear situations: in one hand the plot is located in a suburban colony not yet consolidated, in the outskirts of Villarcayo, which does not have any significant value and with very few constraints but legal ones, linked to the accomplishment of the current standards, which mainly defined the heights, suitability for building and setbacks. And in the other hand, the owners, a young family identified with the contemporary architecture, they defined two questions: a house with just ground floor was a requirement in order to maximize his relationship with the garden and the project had to be unequivocally within a limited budget.

Hence, the proposal, should answer, over other premises, to the “optimism” and to the “optimization” which were demanded by the owners, supposing those as the starting point, its “real context”. The program, relatively common, was defined with accuracy by the clients, it was divided basically in two categories: in one hand, a big sitting room and terrace with direct access to the garden and in the other hand, the definition of the most privates spaces, annexed, consisting in a main bedroom incorporating a bathroom, besides two bedrooms, another bathroom and a space for their children to study and play games, additionally kitchen and garage. At the same time, the plot, with a small size, topographically flat, with a substantially rectangular shape and with a single side having access to the street, the orientation north-south coincided with the diagonal, it does not exist any other remarkable characteristics of the physical environment.

House in Villarcayo, Villarcayo, Burgos, Spain, by Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
Photography © Pedro Pegenaute, via: ArchDaily

Luff Residence by Pohio Adams Architects

The commission to design a new family home for clients posed a number of challenges and possibilities. The site was unusually large for the area having never been subdivided like its neighbours, but came with a run down worker’s cottage, that had to remain due to Council Heritage Controls despite plastic weatherboard cladding and an assortment of aluminium windows.

The brief was for an adaptable family home that had to create intrigue and a little drama for clients who entertain regularly. The final design utilized the falling topography of the site to make a substantial, and overtly modern addition recede behind the rebuilt cottage that addressed the street. The contrasts between the structures were aesthetic, and material, with the new addition being constructed from concrete, glazed black brickwork, and steel.

Circulation through the house meanders with the site, courtyards separating the cottage from the new addition, and around an existing Jacaranda tree allow varied sight lines and play up the luxury of space afforded by the large site size, and frames wider views into the surrounding district.

The drama and hardness of the concrete, brick, steel, and glass found in the main living and entertaining spaces softens considerably upstairs where the private spaces play up the warmth of limed oak and more playful colours particularly in the children’s rooms. Privacy, and energy efficiency are provided by the external adjustable louvres on the building exterior, which also provide an aesthetic link back to the horizontal weatherboards of the original cottage.

Luff Residence, Annandale, Australia, by Pohio Adams Architects
Photography © Sharrin Rees, via: ArchDaily

Shadowboxx by Olson Kundig Architects

Shadowboxx responds to a desire to facilitate an intimate understanding of this special place and explores the tradition of gathering around a fire. Tucked between a thicket of trees and a rising bank, the house sits in a natural clearing created by the strong winds that force back the trees from the rocky bank. The building purposely confuses the traditional boundaries between a built structure and its surroundings. Its masses are modeled by winds off the water, exterior cladding is allowed to weather and rust, and shifting doors, shutters, walls and roofs constantly modulate the threshold between inside and outside.

Inside the home, a gallery runs the length of the house with rooms spilling off of it. Two 15’ by 10’ steel clad doors slide open to reveal the main living space, named the cloud room for its ever-changing atmospherics. A glass-walled bunkroom, it contains six custom-designed rolling platforms that serve both as sofas and beds and enable the room to morph and accommodate different functions. Exterior awning shutters facing the water can be closed for protection from the elements or for security when the owner is away.

A guest room sits at one end of the house, and the bathhouse at the other. The bathhouse is topped by a 16×20’ roof that opens the room like a cigar box at the push of a button. Materials with a strong tactility are used throughout the house, including rammed earth floors, reclaimed oak floorplanks, unpainted gypsum board and steel walls, corrugated steel siding and roofing, and reclaimed scaffolding planks for the ceiling.

Shadowboxx, San Juan Islands, Washington, USA, by Olson Kundig Architects, Photography © Olson Kundig Architects, Jason Schmidt, Tim Bies

Kübler House by 57STUDIO

The sites, around 5000 m2 each and mostly surrounded by golf fields and green areas, have the constant presence of the Andes, high temperatures during summer time and winds from the south. The project seeks to incorporate the landscape in the household daily life, following the client’s request who wanted to spend a long time throughout the year in the exterior spaces. The site has a park towards the north, a street on the west side and another one on the south side, where the main access is located. The house is placed towards the corner of the two streets with the intention of freeing the garden, creating continuity with the park and clearing the views towards the east mountain range.

All the interior spaces are organized around an 8 x 8 m central patio that gathers part of the terrain and incorporates it inside the house. Delimited by the ceiling slab, this patio opens its north face to project the view towards the garden. A water mirror runs across a third of its surface reinforcing this perspective through a porch. The public areas constantly participate of the patio, from the main access to the family room, articulating the service areas towards the west. On the east side, a double-height wall lightly closes the private area without losing its participation of the patio and accompanies the ascension to the master bedroom. From there, it is possible to go out into a vast porch that dominates the landscape, where the barbecue area and the swimming pool are placed at a certain distance using the site in all of its extension. Some peripheral walls are prolonged to direct the views and close the house against the winds and nearby streets. In addition, the slabs extend as eaves to protect tall windows from the sun and to cover the terraces. These architectonic elements radicalize the opening of the interior spaces, deepening their presence from the outside.

Kübler House, Santiago, Chile, by 57STUDIO

Editor's Picks

Konstantin B
…the compensation for all the things you simply did not do, polished to perfection. [more...]

Suggested Reading

The Story of Eames Furniture
Brimming with images and insightful text, this unique book is the benchmark reference on what is arguably the most influential and important furniture brand of our time. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

The Guggenheim: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Making of the Modern Museum
First-ever book to explore the process behind one of the greatest modern buildings in America. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

MoonFire: The Epic Journey of Apollo 11
A unique tribute to the defining scientific mission of our time, the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Cars Freedom Style Sex Power Motion Colour Everything

Cars
Freedom Style Sex Power Motion Colour Everything. This lavish and beautifully designed book is the gift book for all car enthusiasts and design aficionados. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Design Icons

Karuselli Lounge Chair
“Without question my favourite piece of interior design, and undoubtedly the most comfortable chair I’ve ever sat in. I like to retire to one with a cigar and a stiff drink as frequently as possible." - Sir Terence Conran. [more...]

Resources

More Books

Case Study Houses
“It’s a huge coffee-table book, which analyses each of the houses in chronological order, with plans, sketches and glorious photographs.” [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

The Eames Lounge Chair
The book examines the evolution of a design icon and places it in its cultural, historical and social context. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

The U.N. Building
Symbol of world humanitarianism, a beacon of unity after the Second World War. More than 50 years on, the 39-story building is regarded as one of the pinnacles of mid-century modernism. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Loblolly House
Including a DVD of the film "A House in the Trees", a real-time documentary of the design, fabrication, and assembly of this amazing house. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Desire
The Shape of Things to Come. An up-to-date comprehensive survey on furniture and object design today, showcasing the crème de la crème of designers. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Marcel Wanders
Behind the Ceiling is the first monograph on one of the most influential, prolific and celebrated international designers today. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

How to Wrap Five Eggs
A mid-60s classic of Japanese design. Stunningly laid-out paean to traditional Japanese packaging is rife with sumptuous black and white photos of all manner of boxes, wrappers and containers that appear at once homely and sophisticated, ingeniously utilitarian yet fine and rare. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Services