Quantcast

Follow Daily Icon

Email Address:

Maison H2 by Vincent Coste

Maison H2, South Corsica, by Vincent Coste
Photography by Florent Joliot

Paris-Memphis & Off the Moon by Maison Dada

Maison Dada, was created in Shanghai by Thomas Dariel and Delphine Moreau. Maison Dada creates objects that are gently crazy, defying certainty, taste and gravity. The style is poetic, bold, playful, daring and based on the belief that everybody deserve inspiring and meaningful design.

Paris-Memphis, and Off the Moon Collection, by Maison Dada

Apartment MM by Bruzkus Batek Architekten

This Moscow-based couple’s second home is located on the ground floor of a classical villa in the Grunewald district of Berlin. Pared-down to the main elements, the new design for this apartment reveals clear gallery-style rooms, whose character is accentuated by a minimalistic lighting concept from .PSLAB. A pale grey concrete floor is combined with soaped ash and nero marquina marble in the kitchen island and the bathroom, as well as for the long bench in the living room. Between the kitchen and the entrance hall stands a “box” containing wardrobes, kitchen cupboards and a mirrored cloakroom. The clarity of the design is underlined by hiding all ironmongery from sight and by avoiding the use of door handles. Even the fridge door opens simply via gentle pressure – and with the help of an integrated motor. A separating wall divides the kitchen from the dining and living zone with its large dining table and marble-clad fireplace. Sleeping and bathroom zones flow one into the other – the bath is freestanding and the level-access shower is simply bounded by a chrome-framed glass wall.

Apartment MM, Berlin, Germany, by Designer, for Bruzkus Batek Architekten

Purified Residence by Wei Yi International Design Associates

Purified Residence, Nanjing, China, by Wei Yi International Design Associates

In and Between Boxes by LUKSTUDIO

Located in a residential neighborhood next to the Tianhe district in central Guangzhou, Atelier Peter Fong by Lukstudio revives an empty corner lot into both an office and a cafe. Through a series of clean white volumes, the design purifies the existing chaotic site to create a calm yet inviting atmosphere.

From the outside, a floating aluminum canopy connects the volumes together, while delineating between the old and the new. Three boxes stick out from the interior, composing a coherent façade while enabling areas in-between like urban alleys that draw people in from the street. Each box contains a distinct program; café, brainstorming area, meeting room and a break-out lounge. In contrast to the pristine forms, the voids are painted gray and left with the original structural ceiling.

Following a process of meticulous spatial carving, openings and niches are shaped within the volumes. Large cut-outs connect the café to the exterior and frame the surrounding greenery. On the inside, white ceiling pockets and wooden niches create a sense of intimacy. The office entry is also carved at its edge to feature a peaceful Zen garden, which becomes a focal point and visually connects the different parts of the office together.

The selection of materials further enhances the pure definition of the spaces. Smooth surfaces such as white walls and terrazzo flooring dominate the main space, serving as a canvas to capture light and shadow. The brainstorming box is lined with polycarbonate panels that form a subtle visual connection between the café and the workplace. Intimate areas are characterized by organic elements; such as continuous timber panels in the brainstorming zone and remnants of an existing brick wall in the lounge.

Combining artisanal café culture with a collaborative co-working space, Atelier Peter Fong adapts a contemporary social model to a local Chinese neighborhood. The complete transformation of a forgotten site into a destination demonstrates how architectural interventions can activate the streetscape and enhance nearby communities.

In and Between Boxes, Guangzhou, China, by LUKSTUDIO

House B&R by ECOING

The design concept is based on the premise that each room offers a unique experience, while at the same time the spaces create an integrated whole merging with the environment, ensuring a vacation stay in a natural seaside and Mediterranean ambience. The surrounding autochtonous vegetation further contribute to such an atmosphere. The villa’s architecture is presented as a playful white block opened by large glass walls with magnificent vistas and contact with the environment.

House B&R, Sevid, Croatia, by ECOING
Photography by Marko Ercegović, Vojo Bašić

Wadi Penthouse by platau

Located in Wadi Abu Jamil at the Beirut central district, the project is an interior refurbishment of a two-floor penthouse completed by Lebanese design studio platau for a family of four. the original arrangement of the penthouse presented a fragmented circulation between both levels, with poor spatial interaction and a narrow main foyer. During its development and execution phases, the project became centered around creating architecture in the light of local craftsmanship constraints.

Wadi Penthouse, Beirut, Lebanon, by platau

House Rheder by Falkenberg Innenarchitektur

The floating spacial sculpture in the park In a time when there are more questions than answers, more choice than decisions and more opportunities than hours per day, there is a great risk to succumb to haste. The new challenge of our everyday lives today is to omit the unimportant and give the essential more space. To feel connected with nature is an integral part of our lives. It gives us peace and support, space for thoughts and grounding in the hectic pace of our age. Through simple observations and the mechanisms of action the old but newly rediscovered human desire for naturalness, simplicity and clarity has been embraced in the architecture of House Rheder. The perceptibility of different lighting scenes, the visualization of natural colours, shapes and movements in the design of the house is simultaneously the means and the intent of our design.

House Rheder, by Falkenberg Innenarchitektur

F House by Pitsou Kedem

Since the dawn of history, ‘public’ architecture – the architecture constructed by institutions of church and state, served as a tool in shaping the consciousness of the masses. Its massive dimensions, layout of spaces, and choice of materials, were all done with the objective of creating in the viewer and visitor a sense of moving between dimensions – from the day-to-day, the simple and the often inferior – to a place that is sublime, inspiring and of awesome majesty – homes to those among the people raised to privilege- the representatives of God on earth.

The Pharaohs in Ancient Egypt, influenced by the Nile which flows in linear manner, designed their temples as a voluminous physical experience. En route, temple visitors move over long stretches that become more convoluted and ever deeper, passing through spaces where each exposes a clue to the next, and where each transition appears to take you closer to the exalted and the shocking, which only the favored will get to see.

Western modern architecture sought to break free of its propaganda-based foundations and serve as a reflection of the values of a society, its culture, and its technological capabilities. It is intended to serve the public and the objectives of a nation’s government – no longer in the form of holy places, but as functional public buildings that are welcoming and democratic in nature. Accordingly, the importance of changing the mind-set of the visitor has been almost entirely absent from the design discourse in recent centuries.

When it comes to ‘grassroots architecture’ – namely, the architecture used in planning private residences – the experience of a change in consciousness upon entering a house is hardly ever thought of nowadays in the design process, having lost its importance quite some time ago. The living spaces and the living room are thus made as one piece, separated from the street by nothing more than a door, both physically and metaphorically.

The house under discussion here is about this experience. It is this dynamic that is generated in its design, explaining it to the visitor simply by placing him or her at its center from the first moment they stand in front of the facade facing the street — an opaque monolithic slab, covered in dark stone. The impermeability of the wall is softened by an avenue of young trees directing the visitor along the length of the paved footpath, directly into an inner courtyard surrounded by a semi-opaque stretch of wood, the first in a series of internal courtyards that form a key principle in the design of the house.

Walking along the path, as indeed the entry into the enclosed grounds, is part of the process of separating from the outside world and contemplating the present moment more deeply. Full attention can now be given to the structure, captured in its spaces like a prisoner – as we stand in front of a large, transparent curtain wall on which we can observe what is going on in the house in absolute transparency, something reserved for visitors invited because they appreciate such loveliness.

Although the facade facing the street is designed as an opaque mass and seems to hold an enigmatic secret, as soon as one crosses the line of the wooden ‘arbours’, the spaces of the house are suddenly visible in all their simplicity. The process of stepping into opaqueness and then catching sight of the private interior as it emerges from the sealed, the hidden, and the monolithic, into an open and light-filled space, would almost seem to confirm that you have entered the place now exposed – the private parts of the house. Here the geometry is simple and minimalist, and is clean and transparent in its form and materials, almost as if it were someone that had turned all his cards face up on the table.

The other internal courtyards, as well as the glass balustrade that encloses the swimming pool, separating it from the other outside spaces, seemingly bring together all the visitor’s experiences into a focused and penetrating experience, one that clearly spells out the boundaries of what is permitted and possible, and defines the house as a private and intimate experience.

F House, by Pitsou Kedem

Editor's Picks

Brick Flip Clock
The classic vintage flip clock, reinvented and redesigned, made from a stainless steel case and a precision machine. Mount it on the wall or simply place it on a desk. [more...]

Suggested Reading

The Story of Eames Furniture
Brimming with images and insightful text, this unique book is the benchmark reference on what is arguably the most influential and important furniture brand of our time. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

The Guggenheim: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Making of the Modern Museum
First-ever book to explore the process behind one of the greatest modern buildings in America. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

MoonFire: The Epic Journey of Apollo 11
A unique tribute to the defining scientific mission of our time, the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Cars Freedom Style Sex Power Motion Colour Everything

Cars
Freedom Style Sex Power Motion Colour Everything. This lavish and beautifully designed book is the gift book for all car enthusiasts and design aficionados. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Design Icons

Fjordfiesta Scandia Senior
by Hans Brattrud

A Norwegian furniture design classic from 1957, Scandia Senior is a comfortable high-back easy chair with a leather head cushion, on a satin swivel base. [more...]

Resources

More Books

Case Study Houses
“It’s a huge coffee-table book, which analyses each of the houses in chronological order, with plans, sketches and glorious photographs.” [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

The Eames Lounge Chair
The book examines the evolution of a design icon and places it in its cultural, historical and social context. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

The U.N. Building
Symbol of world humanitarianism, a beacon of unity after the Second World War. More than 50 years on, the 39-story building is regarded as one of the pinnacles of mid-century modernism. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Loblolly House
Including a DVD of the film "A House in the Trees", a real-time documentary of the design, fabrication, and assembly of this amazing house. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Desire
The Shape of Things to Come. An up-to-date comprehensive survey on furniture and object design today, showcasing the crème de la crème of designers. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Marcel Wanders
Behind the Ceiling is the first monograph on one of the most influential, prolific and celebrated international designers today. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

How to Wrap Five Eggs
A mid-60s classic of Japanese design. Stunningly laid-out paean to traditional Japanese packaging is rife with sumptuous black and white photos of all manner of boxes, wrappers and containers that appear at once homely and sophisticated, ingeniously utilitarian yet fine and rare. [more...]
Buy it here: Amazon

Services

Useful Links